Italian professor – Scuola Insieme http://scuolainsieme.com/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 10:12:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://scuolainsieme.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T191058.566-150x150.png Italian professor – Scuola Insieme http://scuolainsieme.com/ 32 32 Chinese and Italian academics share their views on smart cities https://scuolainsieme.com/chinese-and-italian-academics-share-their-views-on-smart-cities/ https://scuolainsieme.com/chinese-and-italian-academics-share-their-views-on-smart-cities/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 09:57:00 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/chinese-and-italian-academics-share-their-views-on-smart-cities/ Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences Forum. Smart cities should of course have smart technologies, but it is essential that new technologies are human-centered, according to participants from Italy and China at a recent forum hosted by the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences, with the full support of the elite Italian school Politcnico di Torino. . […]]]>

Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences Forum.

Smart cities should of course have smart technologies, but it is essential that new technologies are human-centered, according to participants from Italy and China at a recent forum hosted by the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences, with the full support of the elite Italian school Politcnico di Torino. .

“A modern city can be facilitated by many new technologies, but it must be aware of bigger issues such as climate change and data privacy,” said Michele Geraci, professor at the University of Nottingham Ningbo and former sub -Secretary of State at the Italian Ministry of Economic Development.

In his view, climate change is not a matter of geopolitics, but how nature can be transformed by modern city life and how it should be restored by the joint efforts of all cities and governments.

Guo Changgang, director of the SASS Institute of History, said Shanghai has become a model for smart cities because it has used many fascinating technologies to boost its economy and governance.

“We need to deploy these new technologies in building a more friendly and constructive urban culture,” Guo said.

According to the China Green and Smart City Development Report (2021), Shanghai ranks third among Chinese cities for the quality of its green and smart urban development, after Beijing and Shenzhen in Guangdong province.

The report assessed cities on factors such as per capita GDP consumption, number of polluting businesses, waste treatment services, online government services, and smart transport constructions.

At the forum, Guo introduced some of the rapidly urbanizing areas in China, but said that they are not really high-quality cities, because “a real smart city is not only equipped with new technologies.”

The forum invited Alessandro Arduino, co-director of the Sino-Italy Security and Crisis Management project who joined the online meeting, to talk about the role of the digital silk road in the new smart cities. In addition, Antonino Marciano, professor of physics at the University of Fudan, explained how to use the time crystal in architecture for a better city.

The forum was co-hosted by the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences Think Tank Foundation.


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Defender of the Carmel De Stefano theater – Fra Noi https://scuolainsieme.com/defender-of-the-carmel-de-stefano-theater-fra-noi/ https://scuolainsieme.com/defender-of-the-carmel-de-stefano-theater-fra-noi/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 19:23:25 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/defender-of-the-carmel-de-stefano-theater-fra-noi/ A peerless teacher and director for decades, she now promotes theater at all levels throughout the state. Carmel De Stefano loved theater as a child, studied it at the undergraduate level and beyond, and taught and directed it for decades at the high school level. All of this has prepared her well for her current […]]]>

A peerless teacher and director for decades, she now promotes theater at all levels throughout the state.

Carmel De Stefano loved theater as a child, studied it at the undergraduate level and beyond, and taught and directed it for decades at the high school level. All of this has prepared her well for her current theatrical turn, as a leader since 2016 in the Illinois Theater Association.

After immersing herself in theater throughout her youth and earning a Bachelor of Arts in Theater and Broadcasting in the East, the native of Niagara Falls, New York, decided to head to to the west. Arriving in Chicago in 1976 to attend the Goodman School of Drama, he was offered the opportunity to direct a play in a Catholic high school for girls. She was hired there and taught there for eight years, then became the head coach of theater at Reavis High School in Burbank for 26 years. There she taught, directed, and prepared students for the Illinois High School Association’s theatrical competitions, achieving a string of successes.

After De Stefano retired from the ranks of high school educators in 2016, she began the fourth act of her highly theatrical life. That same year, she became executive director of the Illinois High School Theater Festival, an annual celebration of theater with more than 4,000 students and teachers in attendance and participating. She then served as the second vice president of the festival’s sponsoring organization, the Illinois Theater Association, which works with high school, college, community and professional programs and companies across the State. The spotlight is now on her as ITA President.

Fra Noi: When did you first exhibit at the theater, and what was your reaction?

From Stefano: I think “Fiddler on the Roof” was the first show I saw. It was just the fact that you were transported to another world. You set there in this theater, and these actors became your friends, and they spoke to you.

Fra Noi: What did you like about the theater then? Has your love for the theater, or your relationship with it, changed over the years?

From Stefano: Yes, it probably went from love to addiction or obsession. I love the theater. I love to lead. I love to see the theater. I like working with people and creating shows.

Fra Noi: Tell us about your Italian family.

From Stefano: My parents were my rock and my protector, and my mother was a sounding board. You could talk and she would listen, and she wouldn’t say anything. But later she would say one thing and put everything in perspective. I miss that.

My family was very Italian. We still practice some traditions, we get together before Christmas and bake cappelletti, and we still have a house full of people.

My father made sure when I graduated from SUNY (State University of New York) that I had a degree in theater and broadcasting, but he also made sure that I had a certification in teaching, which I thought I would never use. My dad wasn’t thrilled that I was going to the theater, but when he realized I was going to do it, he gave me the schedule for a show that his older brothers had been on, and my dad said that ‘he had helped. The family members were therefore interested in the theater.

When I said, “Daddy, I’m going to move,” he said, “You should stay home and marry a nice boy. When I moved to Chicago, they came to help me set up my studio. I said, “I don’t think I’m going to get married someday,” so he drove a car here and gave it to me and said, “Here, that was your wedding money.”

Fra Noi: How did you get to Chicago?

From Stefano: After my last year of university, I remember thinking that I should move somewhere else. There was no way my dad would let me move to New York. My sister had just married a guy from Chicago, and if there’s family there, that’s fine. I came here in 1976.

I asked a professor from SUNY, who had done Broadway shows and we really respected him, where to go in Chicago, and he said the Goodman School of Drama, and I auditioned and walked in.

Fra Noi: What were and what are your impressions of the Chicago theater scene compared to other places?

From Stefano: I was amazed. 1976-77 was the year Steppenwolf started performing. I swallowed it. I lived in the city in an apartment, even though my sister was in the suburbs. It was exciting. There were young people, and there was a theater in front of it. And it was very accessible to go to see shows. Most movie theaters are expensive now, even storefronts.

Fra Noi: What happened to Goodman and after?

From Stefano: At Goodman, I was finishing my second year and one of my teachers said to me: “Carm, you worked with high school kids. My cousin is the principal of a girls’ school and she needs a director for a show. So I did and loved it. It was the Academy of the Sacred Heart.

They made me the oldest student. I loved it. The only problem was that it didn’t pay a lot and I had to be a waitress at the same time.

Then I got a job at Reavis High School in Burbank, south of Midway Airport. I went from a girls’ school of 105 people to having 150 children in my classroom during the day in a more working-class setting.

We would do a comedy, a drama, a musical and a competitive play for the theater division of the Illinois High School Association. [The competition entry is] a 40-minute contest. You take him to a place to play and you have 15 minutes to put together your set.

Then we did group performance (another category in the IHSA theatrical competition), which is more like a reading theater.

Reavis, for a school that did not have a theater program, became a powerhouse for group competition and interpretation. With the group interp, I think I did 22, and 17 went down to the state. We won first place once.

Fra Noi: So you retired and took on another job?

From Stefano: The year I retired from Reavis High School, 2016, I was asked to be the executive director of the Illinois High School Theater Festival. It is sponsored by the Illinois Theater Association.

After that, I joined the Illinois Theater Association board of directors. I ran for the second vice president. Now I am president. All board members are volunteer positions.

The Illinois Theater Association is focusing more on schools. But we have all the other categories: professional, theater for young audiences, community theater, etc.

Fra Noi: What advice would you give to someone who aspires to work in the theater?

From Stefano: My advice to students and parents who would panic about kids majoring in theater at university: I would tell them to let them do it. Dark. You can take a different path, but at least you’ve tried it. I meet so many people who wish they had tried.

I was able to do theater, but I was also able to make a fairly good living teaching.


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The brand that will not die – POLITICO https://scuolainsieme.com/the-brand-that-will-not-die-politico/ https://scuolainsieme.com/the-brand-that-will-not-die-politico/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 05:08:57 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/the-brand-that-will-not-die-politico/ Press play to listen to this article Italia Trasporto Aereo SpA has a problem. ITA will start flying on October 15 as Italy’s new national carrier, replacing bankrupt Alitalia, but hardly anyone has heard of it. This is not the case for Alitalia – a legendary brand, albeit tarnished by years of labor problems, inefficiency […]]]>

Press play to listen to this article

Italia Trasporto Aereo SpA has a problem.

ITA will start flying on October 15 as Italy’s new national carrier, replacing bankrupt Alitalia, but hardly anyone has heard of it. This is not the case for Alitalia – a legendary brand, albeit tarnished by years of labor problems, inefficiency and serial bankruptcies. This is why ITA boss Fabio Lazzerini (a former Alitalia) is considering buying the brand as part of a call for tenders announced by the Italian government on Friday.

But if ITA is rebranded as Alitalia, it raises the question of how different the new airline is from the old one.

It’s not just the name. The ITA will fly the former airline’s plane, using many of its slots in Milan and Rome, and will be staffed with reduced manpower from the former airline.

This is not how the ITA is spun by Brussels and Rome. The European Commission determined last week that ITA and Alitalia are separate entities – what’s called economic discontinuity. As a result, the new company is not responsible for the 900 million euros in illegal state aid received by its predecessor, which also allows Rome to inject 1.35 billion euros in new money into the new company.

Brussels has managed to find a ‘digestible compromise’ between Rome’s demands and a strict application of the bloc’s state aid rules, said Tommaso Valletti, former chief economist of DG Comp at the launch of the ‘Alitalia survey in 2018. He also acknowledged that “the decision leaves a bitter taste in the mouth” because “the money will never be paid and the distortion of past competition will never be rectified”.

Valletti noted that, as with many competition decisions, timing has a political dimension. A victory over Alitalia is important for Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi, a respected former central banker who is seen as crucial for the stabilization of Italy.

“In the art of compromise, the Draghi factor certainly helps,” Valletti said.

The rescue of Alitalia was decided by the previous government led by Giuseppe Conte of the 5 stars, whose initial plan did not meet the expectations of DG COMP. After Draghi took office, a series of meetings between his ministers and Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager resulted in a “common understanding” on what was needed to ensure that ITA and Alitalia were separate companies. .

“The rules on economic continuity, especially as they are interpreted during the crisis, are too vague and the outcome of cases unpredictable,” said Massimo Merola, professor of state aid law at the College of Europe in Bruges and partner of the law firm BonelliErede.

This is not the first time that the Commission has approved a transformation for Alitalia.

In 2008, the Commission concluded that there was no continuity between bankrupt Alitalia and its successor, Compagnia Aerea Italiana (CAI), a consortium of private investors convinced by Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi to save the carrier by difficulty. Brussels also noted that there was an “economic discontinuity” between CAI and Alitalia, which allowed the new entity to avoid repaying 300 million euros of illegal aid received by Alitalia.

The Commission was convinced that CAI, operating under the Alitalia brand, would be a different, leaner and more profitable entity. It didn’t work that way. Hammered by competition from low-cost carriers, struggling with unprofitable routes and expensive, inefficient labor, the carrier has spent billions on bailouts and loans.

What’s in a name?

While the ITA desperately wanted to prove to the commissioners in Brussels that this is a separate entity from its predecessor, it is another story when it comes to the client. Just weeks before its maiden flight, search engine results for “ITA” show everything from the Italian Trade Agency to the International Theater in Amsterdam.

“Alitalia is very well known,” said Andrea Giuricin, professor of transport economics at Bicocca University in Milan. “When you try to search for ITA, of course, no one knows what it is. It is not easy to sell tickets.

This makes the Alitalia brand crucial for the new company. ITA chief Lazzerini said he would “do anything” to win the auction, which starts at 290 million euros.

Only Ryanair has publicly expressed an interest, which it has since withdrawn. Industry figures indicate that there has been little appetite among competitors for the struggling brand – although reports indicate that Italian ministerial officials expect some interest.

Alitalia even tried to anticipate the risk of its brand being sold to disrespectful bidders. The call for tenders specifies that tenderers must not use the mark “for activities or forms of communication liable to damage the image of any Member State of the European Union, in the economic, cultural, tourism and transport “.

Only companies “with a net worth … of at least 200 million euros and holding air transport operating licenses or air operator certifications” are allowed to tender.

According to competition law professor Pablo Ibañez Colomo, professor of competition law at the London School of Economics, what is potentially more problematic than open tendering is the way in which negotiations at huis clos will allow ITA to take over a large part of Alitalia’s slots; some 85 percent of the routes owned by Alitalia at Milan Linate airport and 43 percent of those at Rome Fiumicino. ITA will also start with 52 Alitalia aircraft.

The amount the ITA paid its predecessor for the assets was not made public, but the new company said in July it had raised € 700 million to cover those costs.

But transactions made without a tender could open the Commission’s decision to contestation, said Ibañez Colomo.

“This is always one of the things that I found the most difficult or the least convincing in these kinds of circumstances. Because, you could say, you basically get the good sides of a business, or [its] valuable assets… without any liabilities, ”said Ibañez Colomo.

There are some differences between ITA and Alitalia.

The ITA does not have the right to take over the frequent flyer program from the old airline and its staff will be much smaller. Compared to Alitalia’s 11,000 employees, its successor will only hire 2,800 this year, with the intention of increasing that number to 5,750 next year.

This has angered the unions, who are also furious with the Commission for allowing the creation of a new airline not bound by the contracts of the old carrier.

“Alitalia has always been at the forefront of decent working conditions and pay levels in line with other European national carriers,” wrote Livia Spera, general secretary of the European Transport Workers’ Federation, in a letter to the Commission.

“What the ITA is proposing is a way to deal with 18th century workers,” she said on a call. Under the new contracts, which are still being worked out, employees are expected to suffer a 27% pay cut, she said.

Even though there is some slimming down, Riccardo Magi, an Italian lawmaker and head of More Europe, a centrist and pro-market party, was skeptical about whether ITA flying under the guise of Alitalia can be saved from the fate of his predecessor.

“Despite the trick of changing legal entity, Alitalia does not have the capacity to be competitive,” he said, predicting that ITA would continue to have state support in the future. .

Pietro Lombardi contributed reporting.

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Who to vaccinate first among workers? https://scuolainsieme.com/who-to-vaccinate-first-among-workers/ https://scuolainsieme.com/who-to-vaccinate-first-among-workers/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 14:53:09 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/who-to-vaccinate-first-among-workers/ Credit: Pixabay / CC0 public domain The COVID-19 epidemic and lockdowns imposed in many countries have imposed high costs on the population: a combined health and socio-economic crisis, in which the global economy shrank by 4.3% in 2020 and 130 million people face famine. Strategic vaccine distribution plans have generally followed World Health Organization guidelines. […]]]>

Credit: Pixabay / CC0 public domain

The COVID-19 epidemic and lockdowns imposed in many countries have imposed high costs on the population: a combined health and socio-economic crisis, in which the global economy shrank by 4.3% in 2020 and 130 million people face famine.

Strategic vaccine distribution plans have generally followed World Health Organization guidelines. In many European countries, priority has been given to the population according to multiple risk criteria linked to age, work and health vulnerability. The guidelines generally do not provide priority criteria for the healthy, low-risk population under the age of 60, who make up the vast majority of the workforce vital to restoring the economy.

A new study by researchers from the IMT School for Advanced Studies Lucca proposes a criterion for prioritizing the administration of COVID-19 vaccines at the most advanced stage of the vaccination campaign when the elderly and vulnerable population has already been vaccinated. According to the researchers at the IMT School, the guiding principle should be that the next people to receive the vaccine should be essential workers, beneficiaries of wage guarantee schemes and workers at high risk of unemployment. This would facilitate the return to work, the recovery of the economy, and therefore a more efficient allocation of public funds and a reduction in future job losses.

The analysis conducted in the study was based on a dataset that integrates data on human mobility, excessive fatalities, workers on leave, weather conditions and other economic variables. The causal impact of mobility restrictions and blockages was estimated using weather conditions as a source of exogenous variation.

The study shows that with the restrictions imposed during the lockdown, a 1% drop in mobility implies a 0.6% drop in excess deaths the following month. On the other hand, a 1% drop in human mobility corresponds to a 10% increase in the Wage Guarantee Fund (WGF) next month. This effect is more pronounced during the first containment and gradually decreases from June, with the relaxation of restrictions. The analysis then suggests that prioritizing the vaccine to essential workers not eligible for remote work should be the priority. This strategy would help increase mobility, thereby helping the economy while reducing higher excess mortality.

There is also another aspect to consider: from July 2021, the EU regulation on COVID digital certificates allows European citizens to obtain a COVID-19 certificate, which should in principle facilitate free movement within EU Member States. Some European countries are introducing the COVID-19 certificate not only for travel purposes, but also as a requirement to enter indoor public spaces, attend events, access restaurants and even, as in the case of Italy, safe access to the workplace. With this in mind, Italy has already made the certificate compulsory for school and university staff and is currently assessing whether it also makes it compulsory for other categories of public and private workers. As unvaccinated workers from more professional categories and countries could potentially be affected by similar restrictions shortly, the need to consider the professional status and risk of unemployment of individuals when administering vaccine doses becomes even more relevant.

“The pros and cons of foreclosure policies are debated in the literature. In this study, we provide strong evidence for the benefits of Italian locking in reducing excess mortality. However, we also document the collateral damage of lockdowns in terms of the risk of unemployment. We conclude that blockages should be avoided in the future by prioritizing the vaccination of essential workers and those most at risk of unemployment among the healthy and working population, ”said Massimo Riccaboni, professor of economics at the IMT school and author of the article.

Regarding the short availability of vaccines and their optimal distribution, the results of the study are particularly relevant for middle- and low-income countries, where the share of people fully vaccinated against COVID-19 is significantly lower compared to countries with high income, with percentages between 1 and 30 percent. The authors’ future research will be devoted to understanding how mobility patterns can influence employment risk and vaccination campaigns in other countries and across different sectors of the economy.


Greece launches mandatory testing for unvaccinated workers


More information:
COVID-19 vaccination and risk of unemployment: lessons from the Italian crisis, Scientific reports (2021). DOI: 10.1038 / s41598-021-97462-6

Provided by IMT School for Advanced Studies Lucca

Quote: COVID-19: Who to vaccinate first among workers? (2021, September 17) retrieved September 17, 2021 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-09-covid-vaccinate-workers.html

This document is subject to copyright. Other than fair use for private study or research purposes, no part may be reproduced without written permission. The content is provided for information only.


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11 new non-fiction works to read this season https://scuolainsieme.com/11-new-non-fiction-works-to-read-this-season/ https://scuolainsieme.com/11-new-non-fiction-works-to-read-this-season/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 15:19:10 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/11-new-non-fiction-works-to-read-this-season/ In 2018, the Arlee Warriors, a high school boys’ basketball team on the Flathead Indian Reservation in Montana, were in the midst of a buzzing championship as his town reeled from a cluster of suicides. Streep, who previously featured the team for The New York Times Magazine, takes a look at the lives of the […]]]>

In 2018, the Arlee Warriors, a high school boys’ basketball team on the Flathead Indian Reservation in Montana, were in the midst of a buzzing championship as his town reeled from a cluster of suicides. Streep, who previously featured the team for The New York Times Magazine, takes a look at the lives of the players, the collective trauma of the city, and the therapeutic power of basketball in Arlee, where the sport “occupies some emotional ground. part between escape and religion ”.

Céladon Books, September 7 | Read our review

In her third book, Prager sets out to tell the stories of the neglected women behind the 1973 Supreme Court ruling. Using unpublished interviews, letters and personal documents, Prager tells Roe’s story through the life of Norma McCorvey, whose unwanted pregnancy gave way to the Supreme Court case, and three other protagonists: Linda Coffee, the lawyer who filed the original lawsuit; Curtis Boyd, a fundamentalist Christian turned abortion provider; and Mildred Jefferson, the first black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School.

Norton, September 14 | Read our review

In 1659, an Italian court heard a case against caterpillars after locals complained about violating and stealing local gardens. In the years that followed, humans developed innovative ways to combat moose, killer elephants, robber crows, and deadly geriatric trees. After a two-year trip around the world, Roach recounts these methods in his latest book, covering raven blasts in Oklahoma and human-elephant conflict scholars in West Bengal. The result is a rich body of research and reporting revealing the efforts humanity will make to keep the natural world at bay.

Norton, September 14 | Read our review

Srinivasan, an Oxford professor, has developed an enthusiastic following for her astute writing in The London Review of Books, with topics ranging from campus culture wars to octopus intellect. Her 2018 meditation on the politics of sex served as the launching pad for this highly anticipated book, which builds on – and complicates – long-standing feminist theory in six essays on pornography, desire, capitalism and more. Again.

Farrar, Straus and Giroux, Sept. 21


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Parking lot and Italian restaurant receive zoning approval in Wilkes-Barre https://scuolainsieme.com/parking-lot-and-italian-restaurant-receive-zoning-approval-in-wilkes-barre/ https://scuolainsieme.com/parking-lot-and-italian-restaurant-receive-zoning-approval-in-wilkes-barre/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 01:10:00 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/parking-lot-and-italian-restaurant-receive-zoning-approval-in-wilkes-barre/ WILKES-BARRE – Neighbors doubted the conditions set by the Wilkes-Barre Zoning Hearing Panel for Harrold’s Pharmacy to locate an employee parking lot next to their Conwell Street backyard would be met. The land was used for years behind the pharmacy at 250 Old River Road without zoning approval to begin with and neighbors’ trees were […]]]>

WILKES-BARRE – Neighbors doubted the conditions set by the Wilkes-Barre Zoning Hearing Panel for Harrold’s Pharmacy to locate an employee parking lot next to their Conwell Street backyard would be met.

The land was used for years behind the pharmacy at 250 Old River Road without zoning approval to begin with and neighbors’ trees were cut without their permission after employees complained that sap was dripping from branches and trees. branches overhanging their vehicles.

Pharmacy owner Bruce Lefkowitz and his attorney Mark McNealis have sought to make amends to Antonia Camera, Tyler Hammond and Lauren Rosato.

“Which I should have done, and I apologize to my neighbors. I probably should have checked with them before cutting down the trees just to create a good neighborly relationship. So I apologize for that and the next time I definitely will, ”Lefkowitz said.

McNealis added that Lefkowitz will install screens, bumpers and limit gravel terrain to employees to prevent them from parking on the street in the South Wilkes-Barre neighborhood. He painted a grim picture if council rejected the request and did not grant the property setback waivers contained in the zoning ordinance.

“So if it’s not approved, at this point you can tear down the fence. You wouldn’t need to set up any filtering and their perspective will be that of your entire business, ”McNealis told Lefkowitz. “If they think it looks bad now, if you don’t get it approved, it’s going to be worse, right?” “

The camera provided a brief history of his and Hammond’s attempts to purchase the strip of land the lot occupies from the city. It was because of their legal fight with the town selling the former Old River Road Bakery property to LAG Towing that Harrold’s was able to buy it, she said.

“I like to think the prescriptions are great as is and there’s a reason for that because we have to live there and we intend to continue living there,” Camera said.

The Commission heard opposition from neighbors to Bobbi-Jo Romanishan of Shavertown’s request to use the third floor of his property at 275 S. River St. as accommodation for Wilkes University students. Romanishan said she is renting to four students and a teacher. She wanted to increase the total number of student tenants to eight, but the council would only allow five.

There was no opposition and Council approved applications for Mora’s Grocery at 300 Barney St. and La Piazza Bella, an Italian restaurant, at 208 Carey Ave.

Lawyer Angelo Terrana said his client, Henry Mendoza, had an agreement to purchase the Carey Avenue property that once housed the Fred Schuler Inc. Nissan dealership. Terrana said Mendoza had an auto sales and repair business in one section of the building and planned to close its restaurant near Orlando, Fla., And move it to another part of the building.


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John Abdirkin obituary (1955 – 2021) – Tamarac, FL https://scuolainsieme.com/john-abdirkin-obituary-1955-2021-tamarac-fl/ https://scuolainsieme.com/john-abdirkin-obituary-1955-2021-tamarac-fl/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 23:30:29 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/john-abdirkin-obituary-1955-2021-tamarac-fl/ John Abdirkin, 65, of Tamarac, passed away peacefully on September 6, 2021 surrounded by his family following a courageous and valiant 21-year battle with cancer which he faced with great courage and resilience.John was born in Freeport, New York on September 15, 1955 and lived with his family in Massapequa Park, New York, where he […]]]>

John Abdirkin, 65, of Tamarac, passed away peacefully on September 6, 2021 surrounded by his family following a courageous and valiant 21-year battle with cancer which he faced with great courage and resilience.
John was born in Freeport, New York on September 15, 1955 and lived with his family in Massapequa Park, New York, where he graduated from high school in 1973.
After graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree from Syracuse University in 1977, John spent several years in Italy, during which time he learned to speak Italian fluently, traveled through Europe and graduated from medicine from the University of Bologna.
Dr. Abdirkin joined the faculty of St. Thomas University, School of Science and Technology, in 1996, ascending to full professor status before retiring in 2019. During his 23 years at the university, he was instrumental in the planning, development, and launch of the “2 + 2” nursing program in partnership with the University of Miami. Dr Abdirkin is credited with playing a key role in acquiring a $ 1.5 million endowment to fund nursing scholarships that have enabled over 45 students to earn BSN degrees . He has been actively involved in a myriad of projects, including the Summer Research Institute, the Title V Transformational Leadership grant, and has served on numerous committees. Dr Abdirkin has also traveled with students in Italy, promoting multicultural sensitivity and the ability to relate to people of diverse backgrounds. In his role as a classroom teacher, he has taught biology, anatomy, physiology, medical terminology and pharmacology as well as several online and distance courses.
Dr Abdirkin has been recognized for his excellence in teaching based on meticulous preparation and a knack for translating complex scientific information into material that is easy to understand and apply.
John and her husband, Doug, have traveled extensively through Europe, Central and South America, China, Viet Nam, Cambodia and Mexico.
His favorite destination was his beloved Siena, Italy, where he last visited in July 2019, reuniting with many dear friends.
John is survived by his devoted husband of 25 years, Douglas Carson, his mother, Barbara Abdirkin of Tamarac, his brother and sister-in-law, David and Isabel Abdirkin of St. James, New York and his sister, Susan Abdirkin of Hamden , Connecticut. He is also survived by his nephews, Jared Abdirkin and her husband, Dr. Richard Song of Warwick, Rhode Island, Daniel Abdirkin of Boulder, Colorado, Nate Gallant and Noah Gallant of Brooklyn, New York and his grandnephew, Jackson Abdirkin. Song. John was killed by his father, Harry Abdirkin in 2019.
Jean, “Ti amiamo”
A church service will be held on September 9, 2021 at 9:30 a.m. at Alexander-Levitt Funerals & Cremations, 8135 W. McNab Road, Tamarac, FL 33321.

Posted by Alexander-Levitt Funeral and Cremation on September 8, 2021.


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Elderly Mario, Lara Croft and Robotnik will make you feel as old as they are https://scuolainsieme.com/elderly-mario-lara-croft-and-robotnik-will-make-you-feel-as-old-as-they-are/ https://scuolainsieme.com/elderly-mario-lara-croft-and-robotnik-will-make-you-feel-as-old-as-they-are/#respond Sat, 04 Sep 2021 17:16:20 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/elderly-mario-lara-croft-and-robotnik-will-make-you-feel-as-old-as-they-are/ The illustrations show what Mario, Lara Croft, and Robotnik would look like today if they got older, and you’ll feel just as old, if not older. Video game characters, no matter how fictional they are, have the luxury of never getting old, as long as their franchises live on. Classics such as Nintendo’s Mario, Grave […]]]>

The illustrations show what Mario, Lara Croft, and Robotnik would look like today if they got older, and you’ll feel just as old, if not older.

Video game characters, no matter how fictional they are, have the luxury of never getting old, as long as their franchises live on. Classics such as Nintendo’s Mario, Grave robberby Lara Croft and Sonic the hedgehog‘s Dr. Robotnik remains as young as ever with each new release.

3D illustrations were created showing what these characters, and others, would look like if they were as old as their franchises. The illustrations were created with the help of Professor Carol Holland, Professor of Aging Research at Lancaster University. Holland took into account each character’s apparent lifestyle, as suggested by their respective video games, in order to come up with as accurate an estimate as possible.


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Mario was said to be 25 when he made his debut in 1981, which means he would be 65 this year. His brother Luigi was about two years younger than him. Illustrations of both show what they would look like after a life of rigorous exercise. The iconic characters would probably have aged well, although, according to Holland, they could tire more easily. It was also assumed that they would have had a healthy Mediterranean diet – a point based solely on the characters being Italian – which would also, apparently, help them age well.

Dr Robotnik Eggman first appeared in 1991 in Sonic the hedgehog, which is celebrating its 30th anniversary this year. The villainous character was 50 when he was introduced, which means he would be 80 this year. Being involved in countless battles over the years would have taken its toll on the Doctor, and it was thought it would show. Despite his engagement in combat, Eggman more or less always remained seated and this would have resulted in loss of mobility and muscle mass.

Next, Carl ‘CJ’ Johnson of Grand Theft Auto San Andreas. The iconic character was 36 when he was introduced to the 2004 video game, which would make 53 in 2021. The artwork shows that the character would start to turn gray and injuries sustained during his lifetime would have started to really affect him. .

Finally, the work explores Lara Croft, who first appeared in 1996 Grave robber. The artwork depicts the often reckless archaeologist as a 46-year-old man. Due to her adventurous lifestyle, it is believed that Lara would always be in great shape and have her famous hourglass figure. Her defined facial features may have been smoothed out and she may also have gray hair.

KEEP READING: Chinese Teens Push Back Restrictive Gaming Regulations

Source: comparethemarket.com

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Groundbreaking researcher Gardner dies at 91 https://scuolainsieme.com/groundbreaking-researcher-gardner-dies-at-91/ https://scuolainsieme.com/groundbreaking-researcher-gardner-dies-at-91/#respond Thu, 02 Sep 2021 00:12:13 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/groundbreaking-researcher-gardner-dies-at-91/ Allen Gardner, whose groundbreaking research with his late wife Beatrix “Trixie” Gardner involving the chimpanzee Washoe made headlines around the world when Washoe became the first non-human to learn American Sign Language in the late 1960s , died on August 20 at his home in Reno. . He was 91 years old. Gardner was a […]]]>

Allen Gardner, whose groundbreaking research with his late wife Beatrix “Trixie” Gardner involving the chimpanzee Washoe made headlines around the world when Washoe became the first non-human to learn American Sign Language in the late 1960s , died on August 20 at his home in Reno. . He was 91 years old.

Gardner was a faculty member in the University’s Psychology Department from 1963 until his retirement in 2010. His wife and wife’s cross-encouragement work with Washoe was done in their research lab located in their Reno home, known as “The Ranch.” Allen and Beatrix, known as “Trixie,” replicated their success between 1972 and 1981 with four additional baby chimps, Moja, Pili, Tatu, and Dar.

Allen and Trixie adopted the 10-month-old Washoe in 1966. In the backyard of their home in Reno, the two psychology teachers began teaching Washoe American Sign Language. In 1967, when Washoe was about 15 months old, they reported the first results to a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in New York. The Gardners reported that Washoe had learned signs for many words. The New York Times wrote that “The Gardners reported that the chimpanzee created phrases like ‘water birds’ for a pair of swans and ‘open flower’ for access to a flower garden. “

Their findings have caught the attention of researchers around the world. “It was absolutely groundbreaking work,” said Duane Rumbaugh, a scientist emeritus at the Great Ape Trust of Iowa, a nationally recognized research center, in 2007. The new Washoe signing the words “water” and ” bird “was akin to” getting an SOS from space, “Harvard psychologist Roger Brown said in 2007.

The Gardners’ research results sparked a torrent of cognitive research over the next decade. Their fame has helped to strengthen the national prestige of the University.

Heather Hardy, the former dean of the College of Liberal Arts, recalled how widespread knowledge of the Gardners’ work was.

“When I was an undergraduate linguistics student in college, research done with Washoe and the other chimpanzees was included in every introductory linguistics textbook,” Hardy said in an interview with Nevada Today in 2007. Hardy had attended Rice University as an undergraduate student in the 1970s. “The research was interesting and innovative, and it attracted many students to the discipline. People like the idea of ​​being able to communicate with animals, but linguists hope this research will shed light on the nature of human language as well. “

Hardy added, “I was very happy to come to the University as the Dean of a world-class psychology department which includes such a respected researcher. Dr Gardner has made important research contributions in a number of disciplines.

Robert Allen Gardner was born in Brooklyn, New York, on February 21, 1930. His father was a delivery boy for a smuggler. According to Gardner’s obituary, his father and mother would bring baby Allen with them during childbirth. They seemed to be such a sweet young family that people never knew what they were doing. Allen loved being able to claim his criminal role during Prohibition and beamed every time he told the story.

Gardner received his BA from New York University in 1950, then his MA from Columbia University in 1951. He received his doctorate. from Northwestern University in 1954, where he studied learning theory under the direction of renowned psychologist Dr Benton Underwood. His first research position was at the Army Medical Research Laboratory. At a talk on “Love,” given by famous psychologist Harry Harlow, Allen met Trixie, who in 1961 became his wife and research collaborator. The couple moved to the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR) in 1963.

Allen Gardner began his college career studying the principles of learning in rats. However, it was the Gardner’s pioneering cross-chimpanzee studies, beginning with Washoe in 1966, that gave it media prominence.

Allen and Trixie, then both psychology professors at UNR, insisted on rigorous methods even under the seemingly lax conditions of their cross-host lab. The relaxed home-like conditions provided the chimpanzees with an environment that resembled that of human infants. Strict controls during testing ruled out the possibility of directing, ensuring that all signs produced by the chimpanzees came from them. The Gardners continued to publish new analyzes on the years of data they had collected long after the last chimpanzees left Reno in 1981. In 1989 they published the book Teaching sign language to chimpanzees chronicle of cross-promotion research.

By the time the Gardners began their studies, captive chimpanzees typically lived in sterile cages, exposed only to spoken language, which chimpanzees are able to understand, but seem physically unable to produce. A mainstay of captive chimpanzee care today, an enriched environment was crucial to the success of cross-placement studies. The Gardners realized that it would be impossible to draw meaningful comparisons between the development of intelligent and linguistic behavior in chimpanzees and that of human children unless their environments were comparable. The addition of American Sign Language complemented the cross-fostering protocols by providing a two-way communication medium with baby chimpanzees.

Washoe continued to live with the Gardners until about the age of five, and students came to the Gardners’ home to observe Washoe’s interactions and signatures. At one point, the Gardners reported to a reporter that they had compiled over 3,500 pages of handwritten field notes. In April 1974, Washoe was featured in a feature airing on PBS’s science series Nova, titled “The First Signs of Washoe.”

“The idea was that when she was older, we would take her back to college,” Trixie Gardner told the Reno Gazette-Journal in a 1995 interview. “But that never happened.”

“People have the most amazing notions of what an animal can’t do,” Allen Gardner added in an interview with the Reno Gazette-Journal in 1990, noting that he and his wife never called Washoe or the later chimpanzees of “subjects” or “pets”. But rather as a “foster family”. Allen told the Ogden, Utah Signpost in 1986 that the key determination of the Washoe research method was sign language, not the attempt to teach Washoe language. “In past chimpanzee breeding experiences, speech was the guideline,” he said.

“The object of our research was to learn how chimpanzees are like humans,” Allen Gardner said in an interview with Nevada Today in 2007. “To measure this accurately, chimps would have to be bred as human children and to do that we had to share a common language. “

Invitations to lecture on the signatory chimpanzees have come in from around the world, including Brazil, South Africa, Italy and France. Early on, Dr Jane Goodall invited them to visit Gombe Stream in Tanzania, giving them their first chance to see chimpanzees in the wild.

Allen co-founded and was a researcher in psychology at the University’s Center for Advanced Studies, and was director from 1990 to 1993. He received the Foundation Professor Award in 1988. In 1992, Allen and Trixie collaborated with the Italian primatologist Dr. Bruno Chiarelli at a NATO-funded conference held in Cortona, Italy, bringing together renowned students and scientists from around the world to discuss the ethological roots of Culture.

In 1995, Trixie Gardner passed away suddenly while on a speaking tour of Italy. Allen and Trixie had collaborated on a textbook that isolated hypotheses from current learning theories, examined the evidence for each, and showed a way forward.

Three years after Trixie’s death, Allen finished and published his book The structure of learning: from sign stimuli to sign language, which serves as an introduction to their notion of feed-forward learning.

Washoe, who learned about 130 signs in American Sign Language, died in Washington in 2007 at the age of 42. For many years, she had lived on the Ellensburg campus of Central Washington University as part of the Chimpanzee and Human Communications Institute on campus.

In 2010, Allen retired from the University of Nevada, Reno with a celebratory symposium given by his students. After his retirement from teaching, Allen continued to collaborate and publish with his alumni.

Allen’s younger brother Herb Gardner was well known for his Sunday comics, The Nebbish, and for his game A thousand clowns. Allen’s brother predeceased him. Chimpanzee Tatu, the only surviving participant in the cross-placement studies, now resides at the Fauna Foundation, a chimpanzee sanctuary near Montreal, Quebec.

(Note: This story contains text passages from Allen Gardner’s obituary as well as additional reports and quotes from newspaper articles from the time.)


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Obituary of Joseph Mangiamele (1923 – 2021) – St Francis, WI https://scuolainsieme.com/obituary-of-joseph-mangiamele-1923-2021-st-francis-wi/ https://scuolainsieme.com/obituary-of-joseph-mangiamele-1923-2021-st-francis-wi/#respond Sat, 28 Aug 2021 19:49:54 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/obituary-of-joseph-mangiamele-1923-2021-st-francis-wi/ Mangiamele, Joseph F. January 7, 1923 – August 23, 2021 Joseph F. Mangiamele, 98, slipped away peacefully at his home in St. Francis, WI on August 23, 2021. He was born on January 7, 1923 in Omaha, NE. Joe grew up in Omaha, tragically lost his mother early on, and was like a second father […]]]>
Mangiamele, Joseph F.

January 7, 1923 – August 23, 2021

Joseph F. Mangiamele, 98, slipped away peacefully at his home in St. Francis, WI on August 23, 2021. He was born on January 7, 1923 in Omaha, NE.

Joe grew up in Omaha, tragically lost his mother early on, and was like a second father to his younger brother Sam. He was in the military during World War II, graduated from the University of Nebraska at Omaha, and went on to obtained his doctorate in London, England. He met and married Ebba “Ebby” Hjertstedt, and they took up residence in Omaha where he was a town planner. They then moved to Milwaukee, WI, where he became professor emeritus in the School of Architecture and Planning at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. In addition to his teaching job, he had a thriving business as a town planning consultant in Wisconsin and Great Britain. With a sharp wit and a mastery of both history and politics, he has never shied away from controversy. Whether it was giving civics classes at city council meetings or fighting for the construction of the first contemporary house on Lake Shore Drive, he was quietly persuasive. He was also an active and long-standing member of the Italian Community Center.

After retiring from college, he turned to the arts – a childhood passion he never thought he could pursue – and trained to become a painter and sculptor. With his typical conviction, he wanted to demonstrate the important influence that art and sculpture could have in public spaces by placing his own work. After years of design, his rising stainless steel sculpture named “New Beginnings” can be seen in perpetuity on the southeast corner of East Chicago and North Jackson streets in downtown Milwaukee.

He was predeceased by his parents, Sebastiano and Maria (Pistone) Mangiamele; stepmother, Providenza “Nancy” (Amenta-Cattano) Mangiamele; 3 brothers, Carl A. Mangiamele, Angelo S. Mangiamele, both from Omaha, Sam Mangiamele from California; and his wife, Ebba “Ebby” Hjertstedt. He is survived by his nieces and nephews; and a good friend Annie. He will be sorely missed.

HARDER FUNERAL HOME

Brookfield, WI 262-781-8350

Posted by Omaha World-Herald on Aug 29, 2021.


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