Language learning – Scuola Insieme http://scuolainsieme.com/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 07:22:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://scuolainsieme.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T191058.566-150x150.png Language learning – Scuola Insieme http://scuolainsieme.com/ 32 32 By Growth Rate, Type, Applications, Geographies and Forecast to 2026 https://scuolainsieme.com/by-growth-rate-type-applications-geographies-and-forecast-to-2026/ https://scuolainsieme.com/by-growth-rate-type-applications-geographies-and-forecast-to-2026/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 17:24:57 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/by-growth-rate-type-applications-geographies-and-forecast-to-2026/ The latest research report on Online language learning in business market Thoroughly assesses all the factors that positively or negatively influence the dynamics of the industry during the period 2021-2026, in order to help stakeholders to develop effective action plans that improve revenue streams. In addition, it offers predictions regarding industry behavior and verifies them […]]]>

The latest research report on Online language learning in business market Thoroughly assesses all the factors that positively or negatively influence the dynamics of the industry during the period 2021-2026, in order to help stakeholders to develop effective action plans that improve revenue streams. In addition, it offers predictions regarding industry behavior and verifies them with statistical data and validated research techniques. In addition, the document brings together qualitative and quantitative data from primary and secondary sources for a comprehensive analysis of this area.

The report highlights the main drivers and lucrative prospects that will improve returns over the evaluation period. It also highlights the challenges faced by vertical companies and offers solutions to overcome them. In addition, it assesses each submarket to derive the total scope and size of the market.

Market segmentation and coverage

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Product line: on-premise and cloud platforms

  • The document includes past data as well as estimates regarding the compensation, market share and growth rate of each product segment.

Application spectrum: small businesses, large businesses, by region, North America, United States, Canada, Europe, Germany, France and U

  • Historical records and forecasts regarding the market share, product demand and growth rate of each application segment are provided.

Regional bifurcation: North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America and Middle East & Africa.

  • Information regarding the accumulated revenues amassed, the aggregate sales accumulated and the growth rate achieved by each regional market, as well as approximations for the same are presented in the document.

Summary of the competitive landscape

The main competitors impacting the dynamics of the online business language learning market size are Pearson Rosetta Stone Berlitz EF Education First Linguatronics Cactus Worldwide inlingua International Learnship Networks Voxy. The document also includes critical details about the finances, manufacturing facilities, product portfolio and strategic movements of these companies. Thus, it helps suppliers to successfully implement plans, such as research and development, geographic expansion, mergers and acquisitions, and new product launches, to improve their revenues during the forecast period. .

Some of the key questions this report answered:

What will the market growth rate, growth dynamics or market acceleration be during the forecast period?

What are the key factors driving the Online Language Learning for Business market?

What was the size of the emerging corporate online language learning market in value in 2020?

What will be the size of the emerging online language learning for business market in 2026?

Which region is expected to hold the highest market share in the online language learning for business market?

What trends, challenges and obstacles will impact the development and size of the global online language learning for business market?

What are the sales volume, revenue, and price analysis of the major manufacturers of the Online Language Learning for Business market?

Why buy this report?

  • It provides niche information for decision on every possible segment helping in the process of strategic decision making.
  • Market size estimate of the online corporate language learning market on a regional and global basis.
  • Unique research design for market size estimation and forecasting.
  • Identification of large companies operating in the market with associated developments.
  • Comprehensive scope to cover all possible segments helping each player in the online language learning business market.

Industry Value Chain Analysis Overview

The document helps companies maximize their profit margins by dramatically reducing costs at multiple stages of the product / service lifecycle while delivering optimal value to end users. It does this by assessing the entire value chain against sales channels, distributors and customers.

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Why is it better for students to learn in the language they can understand? https://scuolainsieme.com/why-is-it-better-for-students-to-learn-in-the-language-they-can-understand/ https://scuolainsieme.com/why-is-it-better-for-students-to-learn-in-the-language-they-can-understand/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 12:17:30 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/why-is-it-better-for-students-to-learn-in-the-language-they-can-understand/ It is best for students to learn in the language they understand, says Sandeep Bapna, Managing Director, Khan Academy India According to the National Education Policy (NEP) 2020, “as far as possible, the language of instruction up to class 5 at least, but preferably up to class 8 and beyond, will be the language spoken […]]]>

It is best for students to learn in the language they understand, says Sandeep Bapna, Managing Director, Khan Academy India

According to the National Education Policy (NEP) 2020, “as far as possible, the language of instruction up to class 5 at least, but preferably up to class 8 and beyond, will be the language spoken at home / mother tongue / local language / regional language ”. While not mandatory, research shows that it has its benefits, such as effective learning in communities where children have minimal or no English proficiency, and can help reduce dropouts and increase student participation.

Khan Academy India (KAI), a non-profit organization incorporated in India, has aligned itself with this belief. Founded by Khan Academy Inc. and Tata Trusts, KAI provides free learning resources and assessment and feedback tools for grades 1-12, in English and regional languages ​​like Hindi, Gujarati, Kannada and Tamil. Sandeep Bapna, Managing Director, Khan Academy India, further sheds light on the effectiveness of learning in regional languages ​​and explains why KAI supports this idea.

Khan Academy embarked on digital learning long before the pandemic. What advantage did you have because of this?

First of all, it allowed us to react quickly to the situation. Within two to three weeks of the schools closing, we were able to reach five lakh students in Delhi with “home learning” kits. We were able to take similar steps with a few other state partners. The advantage was therefore that we had the necessary resources to deliver.

Is the challenge for KAI unique due to the multiplicity of instructional materials and tables?

It’s a challenge for everyone in India, so it’s not unique in that sense. The real challenge for us is: how fast can we move forward on this front? Translating a large body of content takes time, as it’s not just about using voiceovers, but recreating the entire content.

How does the localization process work?

In three stages: The first is the translation, which takes around nine months; then we start the pilot phase with 50-100 schools to assess how the content can be integrated and what type of training works; finally, we must start to develop. The challenge of the last step is the infrastructure available in the schools. It is changing a bit now. With this model in place, over the next two to three years, we aim for 9 out of 10 students to have access to KAI resources in their own language.

How to make teaching in regional languages ​​more effective in the context of higher education, employment or research opportunities?

If you are a learner of a regional language, the first priority should be to build a solid foundation in your early years of schooling, up to college. If you can consolidate your understanding of math, science, and language in your own language, you are ready to continue in the language of your choice. But here is where things come into play that are beyond our purview: are there enough high-quality educational institutions in local languages ​​where students can pursue advanced careers?

There is research globally on blended learning, where a student has to learn both a subject like math and the language in which it is taught. We make life difficult for students. So, at least initially, it is best for students to learn in the language they can understand. This way, they can focus only on the topic.

Have you been able to measure the effectiveness of learning in a regional language?

We did not and it will likely be a complex study. When we started in India about four years ago, KAI was only available in English. The share of the vernacular was then 0%. Now it’s already over 15-20% per month. I predict that in a few years it will be over 50%. It is a combination of content that becomes available, students become aware of the content and use it. If you see metrics like YouTube videos, Hinglish videos trump all other languages. So, from an engagement parameter, I would say that learning in a regional language is definitely more effective.

In a changing educational scenario, what is the way forward?

Technology can be used to empower teachers. So, taking advantage of the technology in a classroom with a human who can guide students in the early years will be the most effective method.


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A New Hope “in the Navajo language https://scuolainsieme.com/a-new-hope-in-the-navajo-language/ https://scuolainsieme.com/a-new-hope-in-the-navajo-language/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 22:28:12 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/a-new-hope-in-the-navajo-language/ Language: taking a centuries-old language far, far into the future Many Indigenous speakers are striving to ensure that the next generation preserves dine in an effort to revitalize dying Indigenous languages. Part of this is involving young people in learning the language and starting conversations between speakers of all ages. This is what led Wheeler […]]]>

Language: taking a centuries-old language far, far into the future

Many Indigenous speakers are striving to ensure that the next generation preserves dine in an effort to revitalize dying Indigenous languages. Part of this is involving young people in learning the language and starting conversations between speakers of all ages.

This is what led Wheeler to “Star Wars”.

The film’s appeal spans generations, and the translation has sparked conversations about the tenacity of the Navajo language.

“It reopens a safe dialogue for people who don’t speak Navajo and want to learn Navajo. This reopens the dialogue for fluent speakers, ”said Manny Wheeler.

After decades of language degradation in the residential schools that Indigenous children were forced to attend for the first time in the 1860s and further difficulties in sustaining language education and the engagement of younger generations, many Indigenous languages are either endangered or extinct.

Once the Civilization Fund Act was enacted in 1819, the federal government began enacting assimilation policies to “civilize” Indigenous peoples, one of whom established residential schools to westernize Indigenous children. This meant punishing Indigenous children if they spoke their own language instead of English.

From 1860 to 1978, tens of thousands of children from Native American communities attended schools, where They had known “Physical, sexual, cultural and spiritual abuse and neglect,” according to the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition.

While not all Indigenous children were sent to residential school, the practice has resulted in generations of people with little or no connection to their mother tongue.

“This is where the bond was severed,” Wheeler said.

The Navajo language is traditionally transmitted orally. But, as less and less of the population retained and shared the language, native speakers were rapidly declining.

“We learned it from our parents who speak to us in Navajo, our grandparents speak to us in Navajo,” Yazzie said. “But since the generations do not speak it, how will the language be transmitted?

After voicing Leia, Yazzie was inspired. She started creating short language learning videos, which she posts on TIC Tac alongside the Star War cosplay and actor videos in Diné.

“I started using my role as Princess Leia as a path because this is how people know me, this is how people recognize me,” Yazzie said. “Now that I have your attention, let me teach you something.”

Yazzie publishes basic information, such as numbers and colors, and supports translation requests from subscribers. It makes a difference, she says. Young and old alike pair up his videos and follow his short lessons.

In a video, she takes on the rainbow. Red is “lichxii ‘” and blue is “dootl’izh”.

@ l1ttlewolves

Partial REST – Diné Bizaad Colors #nativetiktoks #indigenous # dinébizaad #navajo #having dinner

Diné Bizaad Colors – ✌🏽Zee✌🏽

She said that TikTok’s short, digestible format makes it easier to retain information and attention. It fills a gap for oral teaching and supplements it with a short written and oral communication.

Its ultimate goal is to involve people in the language, even if it is only for a few moments.

“It’s 60 seconds,” Yazzie said. “It’s not like you have to sit there for an hour-long lesson.”

Art: Aboriginal artists featured in “The force is with our people”

The aura around the film has extended far beyond the premiere.

Tony Thibodeau, of the Museum of Northern Arizona in Flagstaff, first saw the dubbed film at Indigenous Comic-Con in 2016.

He, like Wheeler, recognized his potential.

Over the next three years, Thibodeau interviewed Navajo artists inspired by “Star Wars” and organized an exhibition at the museum – “The force is with our people”.

The exhibition, which opened in October 2019, featured works by 24 Indigenous artists that reflect a ‘Star Wars’ influence. Pieces – some of which remain today – included in the gallery included a Hopi R2D2, Hongeva-Camarillo’s golden C3PO cosplay, and an intricately designed Darth Vader helmet.

Thibodeau discovered that “Star Wars” resonates with Indigenous artists through three themes that link Navajo culture to a film with a lasting impact on pop culture.

The first is the Force. In Navajo teachings and oral traditions, balance and harmony remain recurring themes. In “Star Wars” much of the plot concerns the interactions of the dark side with the light side.

Thibodeau also noted that the anti-imperialist themes of the artwork resonated throughout the plot of the film franchise.

“It is literal resistance to military imperialism, resistance to Empire,” he said. “It resonates with a lot of Indigenous people if you look at the history between Western expansion, colonialism and Western imperialism. “

The third parallel is the similarity between the landscape of the indigenous lands and the relief of the planet. Tatooine.

Thibodeau mentioned one of the artists in the show, Ryan Singer, who remembers playing with “Star Wars” toys in his grandmother’s house. His backyard stretched out into a vast desert, leaving Singer to feel like he was on the outskirts of the Great Carkoon Pit.

A small portion of the exhibit is still on display – the Hopi R2D2s, Diné interpretations of characters in a comic book style, and Hongeva-Camarillo’s C3PO cosplay. It is important to emphasize to visitors that indigenous peoples and indigenous cultures are not frozen in time, he said.

“You can go back and look at what this culture looked like 50 years ago, 100 years ago, but I think it’s also important to present aspects of what this culture looks like today,” did he declare. “Native people are as influenced by popular culture as anyone else. “


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Viva-MTS offers premium subscription to BUSUU language learning app https://scuolainsieme.com/viva-mts-offers-premium-subscription-to-busuu-language-learning-app/ https://scuolainsieme.com/viva-mts-offers-premium-subscription-to-busuu-language-learning-app/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 10:04:12 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/viva-mts-offers-premium-subscription-to-busuu-language-learning-app/ Viva-MTS offers a premium subscription to the “BUSUU” application, specially designed for its subscribers. “BUSUU” is one of the largest language learning communities, offering the possibility of taking up to 12 language courses both on mobile and web platforms. The service offers: – 3-day free trial– possibility to subscribe for 1 day, 1 week or […]]]>

Viva-MTS offers a premium subscription to the “BUSUU” application, specially designed for its subscribers. “BUSUU” is one of the largest language learning communities, offering the possibility of taking up to 12 language courses both on mobile and web platforms.

The service offers:

– 3-day free trial
– possibility to subscribe for 1 day, 1 week or 1 month (30 days)
– courses in 12 languages: English, Spanish, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Chinese, Russian, Japanese, Arabic, Turkish and Polish
– Premium subscription to have full access to the application
– Ability to receive comments from native speakers
– Premium subscription at a special price for Viva-MTS subscribers.

How to subscribe?

– Going through https://busuu.mts.am portal by clicking on the “Register” button,
– By sending an SMS to the short number 2878: send “Start1” for a 1 day subscription; “Start7” for a one-week subscription; and “Start30” for 1 month subscription and by following the link received in the response SMS.

How to use the service?

The service can be used via the web platform http://busuu.mts.am/ and through the app, available for devices running both on Android and ios Operating systems.

Price of services

1 day subscription – 75 AMD
1 week subscription – 500 AMD
1 month subscription (30 days) – 1950 AMD

There is no additional charge for SMS sent to the abbreviated number 2878. The charges for outgoing SMS sent by roaming are billed according to the rate set for the given destination.

More information here.


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Pandemic-era test scores show students’ math and English skills decline https://scuolainsieme.com/pandemic-era-test-scores-show-students-math-and-english-skills-decline/ https://scuolainsieme.com/pandemic-era-test-scores-show-students-math-and-english-skills-decline/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 22:36:13 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/pandemic-era-test-scores-show-students-math-and-english-skills-decline/ The math and English skills of Nevada students have plummeted since the start of the pandemic – reflecting and in some cases exceeding downward national trends, according to standardized testing data released by the Department of Education on Thursday. from Nevada. The test results offer insight into how COVID-19-related learning disruptions have affected students academically, […]]]>

The math and English skills of Nevada students have plummeted since the start of the pandemic – reflecting and in some cases exceeding downward national trends, according to standardized testing data released by the Department of Education on Thursday. from Nevada.

The test results offer insight into how COVID-19-related learning disruptions have affected students academically, though officials caution against over-reading the data as the turnout was low. significantly lower than in previous years. Due to federal waivers, only 68 percent of students in grades three through eight took Smarter Balanced assessments last spring.

The Clark County School District weighed on turnout statewide, as only 54% of its students in applicable classes took the tests. Participation rates for the other districts ranged from 84.2 percent to 98.1 percent.

Despite this, the results of the students who participated paint a dismal picture of how the learning changes forced by the pandemic have affected their education. For example:

  • Only 41.4% of Nevada students in Grades 3 through 8 earned a master’s degree in English Language Arts (ELA), up from 48.5% in the 2018-19 school year.
  • Just over a quarter (26.3%) of Nevada’s third through eighth graders achieved strong math scores, a double-digit drop from 37.5% for the school year 2018-2019.

Declines in ELA and math skills were more pronounced among elementary school students.

Nationally, the ELA proficiency rate fell 5 to 6 percentile points for elementary school students, but the declines were even more pronounced in Nevada (10 to 11 percentile points). A similar trend occurred with math proficiency rates: the national drop for elementary school students was 11 to 12 percentile points, while in Nevada the drop was 15 to 19 percentile points.

State education officials, however, pointed out that Nevada’s declines would be in line with national trends if the Clark County School District scores were excluded. The Clark County school district – the largest in Nevada and the fifth in the country – operated in distance education mode for nearly a year, before gradually bringing students back last spring.

Clark County Superintendent Jesus Jara released a statement Thursday afternoon, noting that “these test results show us how important it is for children to be in classrooms to learn from teachers with their peers “.

But Jara also went further and questioned the need for statewide assessments.

“The CCSD, the state and the nation must assess the value of these summative assessments and whether they meet the needs of our students and their academic success,” he wrote. “Assessment data should be readily available to our dedicated teachers in order to improve instruction and increase student achievement. “

The test data also revealed persistent gaps in opportunity among various student groups, with white and Asian American students showing significantly higher proficiency rates than their Black, Latino, Native American or Alaskan Native peers.

Almost 34% of white students and half of Asian American students achieved strong math scores in college, compared to 9.4% of black students, 14.9% of Latino students, and 10.8% of students Native Americans or Alaska Natives. Similar differences occurred among groups of students on elementary math tests and elementary and middle school ELA tests.

Proficiency rates among students learning English as a second language were also pale compared to state averages. For example, only 2% of students learning English as a second language were rated proficient in math in college, compared with almost 24% of students in those classes statewide.

“I am grateful to administrators and educators across the state who have persevered in providing high quality learning opportunities for students,” State Superintendent Jhone Ebert said in a statement. “However, we cannot be satisfied until every child has the equitable access and support they need to demonstrate their skills, no matter who they are or where they attend school.”

The CADS assessment data will not be used for school accountability assessments, which will remain the same as of the 2018-2019 data collection year. Students did not take the SBAC tests in the 2019-2020 school year due to closures related to the pandemic and the pivot to distance education that spring. The U.S. Department of Education waived testing requirements in March 2020, a time marked by challenges simply connecting students to distance learning amid building closures.

State education officials have stressed that incoming federal funds will be mobilized to help students overcome academic failure, which the Assessment center, could be several times greater than the effect of Hurricane Katrina on Louisiana students.

All Nevada school districts have resumed full-time in-person teaching this year, although the emergence of the Delta variant has created disruption for students and staff due to quarantines or temporary school closures.

This story was updated at 4 p.m. on September 16, 2021, to include a statement from the Clark County School District.


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Q&A: Alum receives scholarship for exchange program in Germany https://scuolainsieme.com/qa-alum-receives-scholarship-for-exchange-program-in-germany/ https://scuolainsieme.com/qa-alum-receives-scholarship-for-exchange-program-in-germany/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 00:47:08 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/qa-alum-receives-scholarship-for-exchange-program-in-germany/ McKinleigh Lair ’19 is one of 75 Americans selected to study and work in Germany under the Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange (CBYX) program for young professionals. CBYX is a joint program of the US Congress and the German Bundestag. Participants in the program study at German universities and complete internships in the professional field of film […]]]>

McKinleigh Lair ’19 is one of 75 Americans selected to study and work in Germany under the Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange (CBYX) program for young professionals. CBYX is a joint program of the US Congress and the German Bundestag. Participants in the program study at German universities and complete internships in the professional field of film festival or documentary production. Participants are placed with host families during their stay in Germany.

Collaborative writer Jadyn Davis spoke to Lair via email about his time in Germany with CYBX and how obstacles like the COVID-19 pandemic brought him closer to his community.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Jadyn Davis: How has COVID affected your fellowship with the program and what have you learned as a result?

McKinleigh Hideout: I think COVID has forced many of us to slow down and reassess our priorities. I have always known how much I enjoy traveling, but I have also come to fully appreciate the community. Following. I think there is a lot of value in being fully present in the community you live in, wherever it is. While I’m here, I want to focus my energy on seeing as much of this beautiful country as possible while forming meaningful friendships with my host family and other locals. I consider this to be equally important for any career development.

JD: What inspired you to be part of the program?

ML: I have always been impressed with the diversity of experiences in the United States and around the world. This curiosity is one of the factors that led me to pursue a career in documentary storytelling. I think this is also the reason why I spent so much time abroad as an undergraduate student. While at IC, I made a film for Park Productions in Guatemala, took a documentary course one summer in Seoul, spent a semester at the IC London Center, and also studied a semester at Jönköping, Sweden. But despite having studied a few languages ​​along the way, I never became very comfortable understanding or expressing myself in a foreign language. At first I felt torn as to whether I should accept this scholarship, as over the past two years I had gained a lot of momentum in my career as a freelance documentary director of photography. But this scholarship gave me a mix of opportunities that I struggled to pass up – the chance to work towards a language learning goal, see more of the world, and make new friendships – all the while working on my job.

JD: What was your life experience in Germany?

ML: I have been living in Cologne since the beginning of August, taking an intensive language course and living with a host mother who makes a living as a tennis teacher. She introduced me to local journalists and documentary makers that she knows from her club. In my free time, I was able to hit tennis balls with them while learning about the German documentary industry. Tennis has been a big part of my life for a while and it has been rewarding to use it as a small window into my industry and this community.


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Get a pair of truly wireless headphones and a lifetime of language learning at 85% off https://scuolainsieme.com/get-a-pair-of-truly-wireless-headphones-and-a-lifetime-of-language-learning-at-85-off/ https://scuolainsieme.com/get-a-pair-of-truly-wireless-headphones-and-a-lifetime-of-language-learning-at-85-off/#respond Mon, 13 Sep 2021 20:30:00 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/get-a-pair-of-truly-wireless-headphones-and-a-lifetime-of-language-learning-at-85-off/ There is a lot to be said about learning a new language as an adult. Among other reasons why it’s important to have an extensive vocabulary in any language, learning a new language is a perfect way to mark a new job, have an awesome icebreaker, or just keep your mind fresh while on the […]]]>

There is a lot to be said about learning a new language as an adult. Among other reasons why it’s important to have an extensive vocabulary in any language, learning a new language is a perfect way to mark a new job, have an awesome icebreaker, or just keep your mind fresh while on the go. learning to create new short stories or new poems. in a language that is not yours. Learn a new language and congratulate yourself for doing it with the Lifetime Language Learning Pack, which includes a lifetime uTalk Language Education subscription and a pair of high-quality headphones to get you started.

Let’s talk about what lifetime access to uTalk does for your computer, tablet or phone, okay? With your choice of two of 140 different languages, this subscription gives you over 60 different learning topics, up to 180 hours of learning, and offline learning for use on the go. Go at your own pace with hands-on vocabulary lessons, plus fun learning games and answer tools and tips. With this lifetime membership, even if your travel plans are put on hold, you don’t feel like a chatterbox, or have other things on your plate, the learning will still be there for you when you return.

Now that you’ve got something to listen to, let’s get down to business with the xFyro Active Noise Canceling AI-powered wireless headphones. Both noise canceling and small for convenience, these headphones work on the basis of AI powered noise cancellation and a 4 mic system for the ultimate sound. You can even switch between ANC mode, AI transparency mode, or standard audio settings to suit your needs. Even though outside ambient noise is filtered out, the headphones include a talk mode that lets you selectively amplify conversations.

The heads also feature 7mm graphene drivers and a dual beam mic, so no one on the other end will know what you’re doing when you should be WFH. Overall, you’ll get around 100 hours per charge of your favorite jams, podcasts, ASMR sounds, and more of whatever you put in your ears to unwind.

Get the Lifetime Language Learning Pack including uTalk and xFyro for $ 49.99, almost $ 300 off.

Prices subject to change.


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Florence One Schools English Language Arts Curriculum Revamped | Local News https://scuolainsieme.com/florence-one-schools-english-language-arts-curriculum-revamped-local-news/ https://scuolainsieme.com/florence-one-schools-english-language-arts-curriculum-revamped-local-news/#respond Sat, 11 Sep 2021 20:04:00 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/florence-one-schools-english-language-arts-curriculum-revamped-local-news/ “So one of the key questions of our [new] program needed to address is how to make up for lost time, “Leibman continued.” How do we go back and teach previous lessons that our children missed when they weren’t physically in front of us? “ Another major problem with the previous program was the way […]]]>

“So one of the key questions of our [new] program needed to address is how to make up for lost time, “Leibman continued.” How do we go back and teach previous lessons that our children missed when they weren’t physically in front of us? “

Another major problem with the previous program was the way it was organized.

Leibman said previous documents were cumbersome and difficult to navigate, especially for teachers of other disciplines and for administrators looking to see what a teacher was currently teaching.

She added that some English teachers have also struggled to work through the document to find out what to prepare their children for next school year or to find out what students have learned in the previous year.

Another problem was with honors and other gifted courses.

“One of the questions I asked my teachers on my first day at Florence One was what makes the honors the honors,” Leibman continued. “And the answer was silence. And it’s not because our teachers aren’t good, it’s because we are placing a very unfair burden on them.”

She listed another problem with which books students should read. Leibman said the district requires students to read “wonderful” canonical literature that featured many British authors. She said the problem with this was that students don’t like to read books about protagonists who aren’t like them.


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20 years later, Katy ISD students find out about 9/11 for the first time https://scuolainsieme.com/20-years-later-katy-isd-students-find-out-about-9-11-for-the-first-time/ https://scuolainsieme.com/20-years-later-katy-isd-students-find-out-about-9-11-for-the-first-time/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 22:56:08 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/20-years-later-katy-isd-students-find-out-about-9-11-for-the-first-time/ HOUSTON – September 11, 2001 was a tragic day in history. Twenty years later, in a classroom at Beck Junior High School in Katy, many Ms. Madison Hughes ESL students hear about 9/11 for the first time. Students also learned about the important role a small Canadian town played in Newfoundland when 38 planes carrying […]]]>

HOUSTON – September 11, 2001 was a tragic day in history. Twenty years later, in a classroom at Beck Junior High School in Katy, many Ms. Madison Hughes ESL students hear about 9/11 for the first time.

Students also learned about the important role a small Canadian town played in Newfoundland when 38 planes carrying 6,700 people speaking more than 90 languages ​​suddenly had to land.

“I thought about how my mother would feel because she doesn’t speak English,” said Isabella Marquez, a grade 8 student at the school.

Isabella Marquez’s family is from Venezuela. Having learned English in Mrs Hughes’ class two years ago, Isabella knows firsthand how these foreigners felt during five days in Gander, Newfoundland, being in a foreign location unable to communicate verbally.

They were complete strangers who didn’t even speak another language and so it’s such a cool way that these kids realize where the perspective is coming from, ”Ms. Hughes said.

A d

The students said the lesson they learned was that the true universal language is kindness, which the people of Gander have shown to anyone from elsewhere.

“I can’t imagine bringing people into your house and like bringing them pillows, food, like giving them stuff and not understanding what they were saying,” Marquez said.

After watching “Come From Away,” the hit Broadway musical in New York City, Madison, who was not a teacher at the time, said she knew she wanted to share the story once she got there. ‘she would have become an educator.

So for the past three years, ESL students who learned the role of Gander during 9/11 wrote thank-you notes and mailed them to Newfoundland. The mayor of Gander responded by thanking the students for looking past the tragedy to see some of the good that also happened that day. Ms Hughes said the mayor even visited Katy to visit her students. She says it helped him.

Copyright 2021 by KPRC Click2Houston – All rights reserved.


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He fled the Cuba of Fidel Castro. His advice to Afghan refugees settling in the United States https://scuolainsieme.com/he-fled-the-cuba-of-fidel-castro-his-advice-to-afghan-refugees-settling-in-the-united-states/ https://scuolainsieme.com/he-fled-the-cuba-of-fidel-castro-his-advice-to-afghan-refugees-settling-in-the-united-states/#respond Sat, 04 Sep 2021 18:33:00 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/he-fled-the-cuba-of-fidel-castro-his-advice-to-afghan-refugees-settling-in-the-united-states/ As the Afghans flee the Taliban regime and flock to the United States, they land in places like Fort McCoy, located in rural Wisconsin. It is the current temporary home for up to 13,000 recently evacuated Afghan refugees, although military officials are not disclosing the actual number on the base. Marcos Andres Hernandez Calderon lives […]]]>

As the Afghans flee the Taliban regime and flock to the United States, they land in places like Fort McCoy, located in rural Wisconsin.

It is the current temporary home for up to 13,000 recently evacuated Afghan refugees, although military officials are not disclosing the actual number on the base.

Marcos Andres Hernandez Calderon lives in La Crosse, Wisconsin and knows their situation all too well and how difficult it will be for this generation of refugees.

Calderon was among thousands who came to the same Fort McCoy, fleeing Fidel Castro’s Cuba as a refugee over 40 years ago, arriving first by boat in South Florida.

“You can see how your country disappears in your eyes. You don’t know when you’ll go back, when you’ll see your family again,” Calderon told CNN, choking back tears as he pleaded for the people. put himself in the shoes of these refugees, shoes he once wore. “So you feel what they feel. It’s not easy, you know. Being separated from your family, coming to a country where you don’t know anything. I don’t know the language, I don’t know the people, you don’t know how people are going to like or dislike you. “

The conditions of the 1980 Cuban refugee influx, otherwise known as the “Mariel Boatlift,” were different from those thousands of Afghan refugees flee today. Named after the port of Mariel, west of Havana, these “Marielitos” left after Castro announced they could, in numbers that eventually grew to around 125,000, mostly making the trip to boat.

A number of them had been released from Cuban prisons and mental health facilities, creating an at times volatile population inside places like Fort McCoy at the time.

“Living there was uh… that was something,” Calderon said with a laugh. “They were people from mental hospitals, they were people from prison, they were government people, they were people from everywhere and a lot of them didn’t like each other. Sometimes you fight. , sometimes you dance, sometimes you hear music. “

It is a situation that he and other Cubans like him in rural Wisconsin see as different from what is happening now.

“I don’t think they are going to fear as much as we are because they came to seek asylum because of the war that was going on there,” said Jose Lores, a 64-year-old former Cuban refugee who arrived in South Florida by boat in June 1980 before being taken to Fort McCoy. “They know they are being persecuted and they [the Taliban] were going to kill them. They’re going to have to thank God for America because America is opening the door to receive them. “

“Just because you don’t know them, they’re a different race, they’re a different color, whatever. We’re all human, and we all deserve a second chance,” said Norberto Gomez Mendez, a 63-year-old Cuban refugee. “I believe here in America you open the door to the whole world, America is built from people who immigrate from all over the world.”

Learn the language

Based on their own experiences, these Cubans have some simple advice for this new generation of refugees.

“Learn the language. And find help … from the people who are willing to do it,” Calderon told CNN. “Because it’s very, very, very hard to come from another country where you can’t buy anything or ask people for direction or whatever because you can’t communicate.”

Apart from the language, learning the general rules of a completely foreign environment can be a difficult process.

“They are going to have to have someone with them who knows what the current situation is,” Gomez Mendez said.

“To move, to move and to learn, they will have to be constantly guided. “

It’s advice that includes everything from getting a proper job and education to avoiding trouble with law enforcement.

“Learn the law of the land,” Lores said. “Why? We came from a country where we only knew one law, the law of the communist country. That’s all. When we came to America, we only really learned the law for years. late, and that’s one of the things that got us in trouble. “

The consequences of a mistake can last a lifetime.

According to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services policy manual, crimes like murder or what he defines as an “aggravated crime” permanently prohibit someone from naturalizing.

In 1988, while Marcos Calderon was living in Minnesota, he reported that someone was selling cocaine in his home. “They got me because the drugs were in my house,” Calderon said. He was eventually sentenced to federal prison, where he served a sentence of around three years and was released in 1992.

“Even today I am being punished for this crime, I cannot go home,” Calderon said, claiming he had served his sentence and decrying the current dynamic as unfair. “We are more American citizens than Cubans. We have the blood, we have the body, we have lived in this country for much longer. And we ask for a second chance, an opportunity, that someone help us, be able to have things, to travel, to vote. To be treated like an American, “Calderon said through tears, visibly shaken.

A violation of controlled substances qualifies for a temporary ban on applying for citizenship. Illicit trafficking of a controlled substance is considered an “aggravated felony,” which would generally result in a permanent ban, but any crime that fell into this category before 1990 is exempt, according to the USCIS policy manual. That said, the officer still has the discretion to consider the “seriousness of the underlying offense” as well as the “present moral character” of the applicant.

Without citizenship, Calderon and others in a similar situation must pay an annual fee of $ 410 to continually renew their authorization to be employed in the United States. It is a delicate web of government policies that these Cubans do not want the Afghans to face.

Concern and enthusiasm

The Pentagon said on Friday that there were currently 25,600 Afghan evacuees housed at eight military facilities across the United States, including Fort McCoy.

With the influx of refugees, this has left some in surrounding Wisconsin with concerns, from politicians to members of the public.

“If we let some people go, it will create acts of terror that will poison the whole operation and that would be a travesty,” said US Senator Ron Johnson during a visit to Fort McCoy in late August, where he said about a thousand Afghans. were detained.

In nearby Sparta, Wisconsin, there is both concern and excitement about what the next steps might look like for these refugees.

“One of the things that concerns me is just the overall safety of … the citizens of our community, women and children in particular, there is just a huge cultural difference,” said Erica Culpitt, a 34-year-old Sparta. resident.

Michelle Hamilton, who has lived in Sparta for about 30 years, said: “It’s a little scary because we don’t know them, but at the same time, they are people. They are also scared.”

“I think we should help them because they are still human,” she added.

Many helped, donating clothes, shoes and whatever else they could, with the efforts spearheaded by Team Rubicon along with a coalition of other nonprofits.

“We literally fly the plane as we build it, so every day is a constant iteration of how we receive, how we continue to do it better and more efficiently,” said Art delaCruz, CEO of Team Rubicon, at CNN. . “We have to make sure that we can provide these bases as they go along.”

For Cubans a generation ago, they remember the way they were treated and the tensions that resulted from being transplanted to a new country – a new world.

Marcos Calderon said, “Be yourself. Be ready. Learn the American way. Don’t make mistakes like many immigrants did. Do good to others. Show the United States of America that what they have done for them … it has been a good thing, and they are grateful to be here and to receive this help. “

The-CNN-Wire
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