Language school – Scuola Insieme http://scuolainsieme.com/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 10:11:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://scuolainsieme.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T191058.566-150x150.png Language school – Scuola Insieme http://scuolainsieme.com/ 32 32 British workers at the end of their leave: “Will it be Amazon, nursing homes or driving a van?” | UK leave scheme https://scuolainsieme.com/british-workers-at-the-end-of-their-leave-will-it-be-amazon-nursing-homes-or-driving-a-van-uk-leave-scheme/ https://scuolainsieme.com/british-workers-at-the-end-of-their-leave-will-it-be-amazon-nursing-homes-or-driving-a-van-uk-leave-scheme/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 09:30:00 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/british-workers-at-the-end-of-their-leave-will-it-be-amazon-nursing-homes-or-driving-a-van-uk-leave-scheme/ Since March 2020, 11.6 million UK workers have been put on leave by their employees as a result of the Covid pandemic, with the government paying up to 80% of their wages in order to keep jobs open. At the height of the program in May 2020, 8.9 million workers – almost a third of […]]]>

Since March 2020, 11.6 million UK workers have been put on leave by their employees as a result of the Covid pandemic, with the government paying up to 80% of their wages in order to keep jobs open.

At the height of the program in May 2020, 8.9 million workers – almost a third of the UK workforce – were being paid to stay at home; by the end of July this year, that number had fallen to 1.6 million.

The impact on individuals has been varied: some have found new interests, new lifestyles, and even new jobs while on leave. Others struggle with mental health issues, including loss of identity and feelings of worthlessness. At the end of the program, we spoke to five people on leave since the start of the pandemic.

Nadia

40s, creates content for an online publisher, North West England
I have a job that can be done anywhere, so when the pandemic hit I expected to continue – but at home rather than in the office. Instead, I was told I was on leave – but to continue working normally. I told them it was fraud. Their response was: do you want us to sink? They said they would make up the extra 20% of my salary. So for me nothing changed – except that the government was paying most of my salary.

I felt irritated and a little vulnerable. I felt that if I didn’t accept it, I would be fired.

I’m a single parent so that was it in terms of family income. It’s very easy to tell yourself that you don’t need to get involved in business finances.

My main difficulty is not what my company chose to do, but the cultural perception that people on leave have spent 18 months lazy and it’s time to get back to work.

When it ends at the end of this month, I expect to continue in my work. The company is not talking about layoffs. But they want everyone to come back to the office.

I have lost respect for my employers. Now I’d like something in return to keep my mouth shut on what they’ve been up to – I’d like them to be flexible to continue working from home. But I don’t think that will happen.

John cooper

45, manager of sports complex operations, East Sussex
Overall, the experience opened my eyes and made me realize that life could be good inside your four walls and with your loved ones.

I was put on leave in March 2020, but my wife continued to work full time and we were spending less, so there was never a struggle for money. After a few weeks, I asked my employers for permission to take another job, which was fine with them as long as the hours didn’t overlap with my normal working hours. I found a job to fill the shelves of a supermarket, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., three evenings a week. It was a godsend for my sanity. With the salary of 80% of my normal job, that meant we were slightly better off in terms of household income.

I also returned to golf after 20 years, and we moved out of town. I golf four or five times a week, made new friends, and lost weight. I am now debt free for the first time in my life. The pace of life has slowed down, and I realized that you don’t have to be chasing things and doing things all the time.

I met my employers last week and they agreed that I could work part time for them and continue my job at the supermarket. I will be working 43 hours a week in total, but hours that suit me. Before, I was afraid of doing nothing – every weekend I was packed and ready to go. Now I grab some water and a banana and head for the golf course.

Robert

50 years old, teaches English as a foreign language, Oxfordshire
I was immediately put on leave and was really grateful for it, including whenever it was extended. Now that this is coming to an end, there is very little hope of getting my job back anytime soon (I teach people who come from abroad at a language school).

My boss says there are no plans to reopen this year but he hasn’t said what will happen to the people who work there. We all have mortgages, families and mouths to feed. We have been left in the dark without knowing whether or not we will have jobs in two weeks.

I would be on my ass if I hadn’t accumulated savings before the pandemic. My savings have decreased by £ 300-400 per month since March 2020. I applied for driver jobs and other roles but as soon as you mention the leave they are probably thinking ‘forget it’. I now expect to be fired, like hundreds of thousands of others.

I’m mad at people like [Tory MP] Andrea Leadsom says people on leave are just lazy and having fun, which for me just isn’t. I am also angry when I hear people say that workers on leave are robbing the state. I have been paying taxes non-stop for over 30 years and I did not organize the pandemic.

At least I haven’t lost my house yet, I still have some savings and I still have a car that I can sell. When the plan ends and I lose my job, I can at least tell employers that I’m not on dreaded leave. Maybe then I can find another type of job.

There appear to be three jobs available: Driving, Amazon, and Nursing Homes. Everything is poorly paid and nothing will be enough to cover the mortgage and the bills. So I go from a good job of over £ 30,000 to a job of £ 8.91 an hour instead. It’s okay for six months but catastrophic when the savings run out.

‘It’s been crazy 18 months but I took advantage of my leave’ … Charlotte Daniel. Photography: Sonja Horsman / The Observer

Charlotte daniel

28 years old, data analyst for a villa vacation company, Canterbury
It was a mixture of emotions at different stages – emptiness, lack of purpose, loneliness, days mingling with each other, desire for progress. A year and a half without a career development at my age, it’s hard. I love my job and my business so I didn’t want to pursue another career. I returned to work briefly when offered a secondment, but it was a huge shock to the system after not working so long and ridiculously stressful to be in a new role, working 12 hours a day from home. me with terrible wifi. So I chose to take the leave again.

I am currently on the 405th day of learning Spanish online and have started strength training in a bikini, working out five days a week. In May of this year, my partner and I started a business together – a brand of sportswear for women. We were also successful in buying our first home after two failed sales due to the pandemic.

It has been a crazy 18 months but I took advantage of my leave. Now, I can’t wait to reprise my role next month and see my colleagues again.

Pierre, Manchester.
Pierre, Manchester. Photography: Courtesy of Peter

rock

39, Events Administrator, Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester
I have been on leave for a year and a half. Since my job is to organize concerts, I have nothing to do. Fortunately, the college supplemented my salary throughout the time.

But my mental health suffered a lot. I was under the constant stress of thinking that my work could be interrupted at any time. Being stuck inside with a lot of uncertainty made me feel depressed.

The only saving grace for me was that my first child was born earlier this year. The leave allowed me to spend time with him that I never would have had if things were normal. I bonded with him more than if I had only seen him at bedtime, and my partner and I shared custody of the children. For that, I was incredibly lucky.

I returned to my full-time job this month, mixing home and office work. And we have a pretty busy schedule of concerts for the fall. Things are therefore getting better.


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Orihuela to open a language school on the coast https://scuolainsieme.com/orihuela-to-open-a-language-school-on-the-coast/ https://scuolainsieme.com/orihuela-to-open-a-language-school-on-the-coast/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 16:24:57 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/orihuela-to-open-a-language-school-on-the-coast/ The intention is to teach foreign languages, which will include the teaching of Spanish The official language school (EOI) could open a satellite college in Orihuela Costa, according to the Ministry of Education. On Friday, advisers José Aix and Antonio Sánchez held a working meeting with the management team of the Orihuela language school to […]]]>
  • The intention is to teach foreign languages, which will include the teaching of Spanish

The official language school (EOI) could open a satellite college in Orihuela Costa, according to the Ministry of Education.

On Friday, advisers José Aix and Antonio Sánchez held a working meeting with the management team of the Orihuela language school to discuss various topics of interest. Among them, the main objective promoted by both parties and on which work has already started, is the opening of a section of the EOI in Orihuela Costa which would offer foreign language courses and also integrate the teaching of Spanish as a language. foreigner.

The education advisor, Antonio Sánchez, explained the need to “strengthen the links between the council and the language school and, above all, to promote the educational offer it has made. “In this way, we hope to establish a framework for collaboration to carry out common activities so that we can promote language learning in Orihuela.

The deputy mayor, José Aix, declared that “this step will also be a commitment for the territorial cohesion of the municipality of Orihuela and for the integration of international residents in the daily life of our city.

“The Ministry of Education has already made the appropriate contacts with the idea of ​​being able to offer this service next year, provided that the Ministry of Education agrees to the initiative.

The Orihuela EOI, with over 1,000 students, is located on Avenida Príncipe de Asturias, currently accommodates students for a range of languages ​​in English, Valencian, French and German.

Anyone interested in registering can do so on www.telematricula.es.

“More information is available on the EOI website www.eoi.gva.es,” said Sergio Rodríguez, EOI Director.

Finally, the participants agreed to meet again once the new mandate is underway, when they will plan joint extracurricular cultural and educational actions to give greater visibility to the work of the EOI and to integrate it more into cultural life. and social work of Orihuela.


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Fellow Rasmuson to use award for a film script, in Lingít, about the dark history of the Native residential school https://scuolainsieme.com/fellow-rasmuson-to-use-award-for-a-film-script-in-lingit-about-the-dark-history-of-the-native-residential-school/ https://scuolainsieme.com/fellow-rasmuson-to-use-award-for-a-film-script-in-lingit-about-the-dark-history-of-the-native-residential-school/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 00:33:45 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/fellow-rasmuson-to-use-award-for-a-film-script-in-lingit-about-the-dark-history-of-the-native-residential-school/ X̱’unei Lance Twitchell addresses a crowd of at least 200 people who showed up to celebrate the release of Rico Lanáat ‘Worl’s new postage stamp on Friday, July 30, 2021, in Juneau, Alaska. (Photo by Rashah McChesney / KTOO) There is no title for the screenplay yet, but now X̱’unei Lance Twitchell has a grant […]]]>
X̱’unei Lance Twitchell addresses a crowd of at least 200 people who showed up to celebrate the release of Rico Lanáat ‘Worl’s new postage stamp on Friday, July 30, 2021, in Juneau, Alaska. (Photo by Rashah McChesney / KTOO)

There is no title for the screenplay yet, but now X̱’unei Lance Twitchell has a grant from the Rasmuson Foundation to fulfill a long-held dream – bringing a true story to life, about how residential schools came to be. systematically tried to kill native languages.

Twitchell says this dark chapter in the story has recently caught on mainstream consciousness, but it has heard stories for years, from elders like the late Marge Dutson.

“They tried everything. They tried to beat me. They tried to scare me. They tried to shame me. But they couldn’t tear my tongue out, ”he said, she once told him.

She also told a story about her first day of class at the School of the Office of Indian Affairs in Juneau, when her teacher grabbed her by the hair, lifted her off the ground, and shook her violently to punish her. to have spoken Lingit.

Twitchell said these stories of courage still inspire him today, but when he set out to record them years ago, a linguist – the late Michael Krauss, who worked to preserve a number of Indigenous languages of Alaska, some of which have disappeared – encouraged him to have the elders share them in Lingit, as this would better preserve the details of what they experienced.

It was then that he decided to tell the story – in Lingit – of two boys who ran away from their boarding school.

“Torture, abuse of all kinds was happening in these places – and then to have that from the point of view of two young people, who are native speakers of Lingít and who are there as siblings and can communicate with each other and make a decision to get out of it, I think he has a lot of potential power.

The boys used their traditional knowledge to guide them home from Oregon. It is a story he has heard from several members of the same family who have since passed away, with the exception of Florence Sheakley. Sheakley’s father, Willie Marks, is the boy who ran away from school with his brother.

Twitchell says the stepping stone for the script will be a high-quality film by the Elder telling her story to Lingit. Twitchell will receive $ 18,000 for its work and share some of it with Sheakley.

He says it won’t be easy to write the script entirely in Lingit, but Marge Dutson’s words remind him why it’s so important.

“Él i tóoch ulchéshiḵ wáa sá eeshandéin yoo haa kaawashóo chʼu tle tlél ḵáa tuwáa ushgú haa yoo x̱ʼatángi,” he said. “And she said it’s impossible for you to feel how much we’ve suffered when people don’t want our language.”

Twitchell is hoping a script in Lingit can capture some of that sentiment. He says that the subtitles can be used if the script is ever made into a movie.

The Rasmuson Foundation also awarded two other project grants from artists Juneau Lingit: poet Ishmael Hope and Sydney Akagi, weaver and photographer Lingit, who will each receive $ 7,500.

A previous version of this story mentioned that Twitchell was working on a play. The project is a scenario. The title has been corrected.


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Colorado counties that should have updated COVID mask warrants https://scuolainsieme.com/colorado-counties-that-should-have-updated-covid-mask-warrants/ https://scuolainsieme.com/colorado-counties-that-should-have-updated-covid-mask-warrants/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 12:43:00 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/colorado-counties-that-should-have-updated-covid-mask-warrants/ On September 16, Pitkin County, anchored by Aspen, became the second Colorado county to reinstate a COVID-19 mask mandate for indoor public spaces, after Boulder County, whose order came into effect on September 3. This means that 62 of Colorado’s 64 counties currently have no indoor masking requirements. But according to recommendations put forward by […]]]>

On September 16, Pitkin County, anchored by Aspen, became the second Colorado county to reinstate a COVID-19 mask mandate for indoor public spaces, after Boulder County, whose order came into effect on September 3.

This means that 62 of Colorado’s 64 counties currently have no indoor masking requirements. But according to recommendations put forward by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, these numbers should be reversed. As of September 17, only two counties in Colorado have a COVID-19 incidence rate below the CDC recommended threshold for an indoor face covering requirement: San Juan, in the southern part. west of the state, and Crowley in the southeast. According to the centre’s opinions, the other 62 should all mask themselves.

The current version of the COVID-19 dial dashboard maintained by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment uses five color codes to denote disease levels. The green level denotes a cumulative incidence rate of 0-35 cases per 100,000 people, with a rate of 35-100 at the blue level, 100-300 at the yellow level, 300-500 at the orange level and greater than 500 at the blue level. Red. In contrast, the CDC only has four color-coded classifications for the transmission of COVID-19. Blue, or low transmission, has a one-week cumulative incidence rate per 100,000 people from 0 to 9.99; the rate is 10 to 49.99 for Yellow, or moderate transmission; 50-99.99 for Orange, or substantial pass-through; and 100 or more for red, or high transmission.

Federal officials now recommend that everyone wear face coverings “in indoor public places in areas of high or high transmission”, even if they have been immunized, as a follow-up over a seven-day period. Currently, San Juan is the only Colorado county in Level Green, with a cumulative one-week incidence rate of 0 per 100,000 population. And while four other counties are at the blue level (Bent, Conejos, Lake and Sedgwick), Crowley is the only one below the 50 cases per 100,000 people the CDC uses to mark substantial transmission – barely. As of September 17, Crowley’s cumulative one-week incident rate was 49.7.

Most other counties in Colorado are at yellow or orange levels; only two, Moffat and Lincoln, are at the red level. Pitkin and Boulder are both at the yellow level.

Below are the September 17 CDPHE levels and one-week cumulative incidence rates for Colorado’s 64 counties, ranked from lowest to highest. Boulder and Pitkin are in bold, to help you see which counties have higher incidence rates than theirs – 53 in Boulder’s case, twenty in Pitkin’s.

1. San Juan
Green level
0

2. Crowley
Blue level
49.7

3. Conejos
Blue level
73.5

4. Curved
Blue level
86.2

5. Sedgwick
Blue level
89.7

6. Lake
Blue level
99

7. Ouray
Yellow level
121.6

8. Chaffee
Yellow level
142.4

9. Archuleta
Yellow level
142.8

10. Kiowa
Yellow level
143.4

11. Rock
Yellow level
143.7

12. Jackson
Yellow level
144.6

13. Dolores
Yellow level
147.3

14. Yuma
Yellow level
149.1

15. Montrose
Yellow level
149.7

16. Montezuma
Yellow level
149.9

17. Denver
Yellow level
155.5

18. Cheyenne
Yellow level
164.4

19. Park
Yellow level
164.5

20. Jefferson
Yellow level
167.7

21. Arapahoe
Yellow level
172.3

22. Delta
Yellow level
176.4

23. Custer
Yellow level
177.9

24. Summit
Yellow level
184

25. La Plata
Yellow level
190.1

26. Adam
Yellow level
194.3

27. Otero
Yellow level
196.9

28. Broom field
Yellow level
197.8

29. Thrusters
Yellow level
198

30. Douglas
Yellow level
201.1

31. Larimer
Yellow level
226.1

32. Garfield
Yellow level
227.7

33. Alamosa
Yellow level
241

34. Hinsdale
Yellow level
244.2

35. Clear stream
Yellow level
256.7

36. Mineral
Yellow level
261.8

37. Logan
Yellow level
264.7

38. Morgane
Yellow level
265.7

39. Pueblo
Yellow level
266.5

40. Eagle
Yellow level
274.2

41. Las Animas
Yellow level
276

42. Elbert
Yellow level
277.3

43. Phillips
Yellow level
280.5

44. Pitkin
Yellow level
281.6

45. Washington
Yellow level
295.2

46. ​​Cashier
Yellow level
295.8

47. El Paso
Orange level
303

48. Costille
Orange level
309.9

49. Frémont
Orange level
310.6

50. Mesa
Orange level
314.3

51. Welding
Orange level
323.1

52. San Miguel
Orange level
330.3

53. Pistol
Orange level
331.5

54. Large
Orange level
343.6

55. Rio Grande
Orange level
347

56. Huerfano
Orange level
350.2

57. Kit Carson
Orange level
378.8

58. Sagouache
Orange level
381

59. Gilpin
Orange level
386.2

60. Rio Blanco
Orange level
444

61. Rout
Orange level
475.6

62. Baca
Orange level
478.1

63. Lincoln
Red level
509.5

64. Moffat
Red level
1018.7


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The difficulties of teaching Arabs their own language https://scuolainsieme.com/the-difficulties-of-teaching-arabs-their-own-language/ https://scuolainsieme.com/the-difficulties-of-teaching-arabs-their-own-language/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 00:29:04 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/the-difficulties-of-teaching-arabs-their-own-language/ Sep 18, 2021 gOD, DIT the Koran, chose Arabic for its revelation because it is easy to understand. But many of the world’s 470 million Arabic speakers disagree. Almost 60% of ten-year-olds in Arabic-speaking countries (and Iran) have difficulty reading and understanding basic text, according to a World Bank report. Despite decades of investment in […]]]>

gOD, DIT the Koran, chose Arabic for its revelation because it is easy to understand. But many of the world’s 470 million Arabic speakers disagree. Almost 60% of ten-year-olds in Arabic-speaking countries (and Iran) have difficulty reading and understanding basic text, according to a World Bank report. Despite decades of investment in education, the Middle East and North Africa still suffer from what the report calls “learning poverty”. “School systems don’t see the importance of involving children in reading, or don’t know how,” says Hanada Taha-Thomure, one of the authors. “It creates a wedge between the children and their language. Many cannot read or write an essay.

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The root of the problem is bad teaching. Arabic lessons are boring and focus on tricky grammar. Classrooms often do not have printed material. Few schools have libraries. Teachers tend to lack “sufficient command of the language itself,” the report says. At universities in the region, Arabic departments, as well as those of religious studies, attract the lowest-rated students.

In Morocco, nearly 60% of teachers of ten-year-olds do not have higher education. Only Bahrain has a normal school specializing in the teaching of Arabic. Teachers tend to be traditionalists, sometimes resorting to beatings. Children “don’t like the Arabic language because not even 1% of teachers read stories to their students for fun,” said Ms. Taha-Thomure, professor at Zayed University in the United Arab Emirates (United Arab Emirates).

Some blame the language itself. Students learn Modern Standard Arabic (MSA), the official language of administration, but they grew up speaking an indigenous dialect. The dialect closest to MSA is spoken by Palestinians, but only about 60% of local jargon overlaps MSA. The Moroccan dialect diverges much more.

Adults often stumble over the written word too, so reading to children at bedtime is rare. Only about a quarter of Arabic-speaking parents often read to their children, compared to over 70% in much of the West. Reading for fun is widely viewed as essential to a child’s future success. But studies show that Arabic-speaking children do much less than Western children.

Arab education ministries are realizing the problem. Egypt has developed a wealth of online material to bypass traditionalists. The United Arab Emirates has started to equip classrooms with “reading corners”. Across the Arab world, girls far outperform boys, in part because female teachers tend to be better. So Saudi Arabia defied the crisp clerics and let the women teach the boys (albeit separately from the girls). His Ministry of Education pierces the mystique of the sacred texts by distributing Japanese-style comics to all Saudi children over the age of ten, with superheroes speaking Arabic slang. “We are facing generations who do not speak the Arabic language,” says Essam Bukhary, the CEO from Manga Arabia, which produces the comics. “We want to promote reading as a hobby for the younger generations. “

Traditionalists tremble at such irreverent treatment of the sacred language. And Arab regimes fear the freedom of expression that a more liberal approach can inspire. Their censors are banning books as firmly as ever and making sure the papers all say the same thing. Many officials prefer to keep children disciplined by having them memorize what they are told, says Andrew Hammond, professor of Arabic culture at the University of Oxford. Otherwise, he said, they might start to think for themselves.

This article appeared in the Middle East and Africa section of the print edition under the headline “No Book at Bedtime”


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Meatpacking America | John Turner https://scuolainsieme.com/meatpacking-america-john-turner/ https://scuolainsieme.com/meatpacking-america-john-turner/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 14:01:11 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/meatpacking-america-john-turner/ Sometimes it seems Americans are exceptionally good at hating themselves. Red / blue, secular / evangelical, vaxxed / anti-vaxxed, name it, here we go. Media of all kinds encourage feeding these tropes and stoking these fires. And although I mainly use it to discuss new college books, everyone tells me that social media is a […]]]>

Sometimes it seems Americans are exceptionally good at hating themselves. Red / blue, secular / evangelical, vaxxed / anti-vaxxed, name it, here we go. Media of all kinds encourage feeding these tropes and stoking these fires. And although I mainly use it to discuss new college books, everyone tells me that social media is a cesspool of hate and abuse.

And even. Most of us are not full of hate, even those with different opinions about masks and vaccines. Most of us are not that bad at getting along with our neighbors, or at least coexisting peacefully with them. There are many reasons to be hopeful and optimistic.

And qualify. Scholars love nuances, but others should embrace them as well. I recently presented Nicholas Pruitt’s book on Protestants and Immigration in the Twentieth Century. In addition to documenting the wide range of shifting views White Protestants had on immigration and immigrants, Pruitt presented key ministries that took Jesus’ command to welcome the stranger seriously.

What’s new today? In his thought and moving Meatpacking America, Kristy Nabhan-Warren scratches beneath the surface of Red State, a small American town, to tell a story that is both depressing and encouraging. She takes two groups of Americans seriously. First, the refugees “who have migrated and settled and who persist, despite many obstacles, in many lives for themselves in the Midwest Corn Belt”. A necessary point of clarification. It refers “to all brown and black women and men who come to America for a better life as refugees, whether or not they have officially been granted refugee status from the US government. They are fleeing poverty, violence and death. His other subjects are “people who have been overlooked and stereotyped by the mainstream media: the white Iowans.” Indeed, the two groups are the frequent subjects of caricature and derision.

I particularly like the way Nabhan-Warren frames the “sticky window of whiteness”. Many of his white subjects tolerate “The presence of refugees in their community”, but at the same time, “wish things could be what they imagine to be“ as they were before ”- white and predictable”. As she puts it, this kind of racial nostalgia coexists with the “belief that whiteness is superior,” but Nabhan-Warren concludes that the perspective of Midwestern whites deserves more attention. They voted for Donald Trump and others who espoused hateful rhetoric, but themselves “are not the angry white racists their votes would suggest.”

Meatpacking America is not for the faint of heart. Nabhan-Warren – who reveals she’s been a vegetarian for thirty years – spent a week observing workers at Iowa Premium Beef in Tama, Iowa. This fieldwork produced the most moving and heartbreaking chapter of the book. His observations began with the inspection of newly arrived live cattle and their slaughter:

It was like a sacred moment. I found myself whispering a sweet prayer of thanks to this creature, whose life was taken to feed people. Tears rolled down my face and I felt my throat tighten in sympathy and empathy for this animal. His meat would end up on a plate somewhere, and I pray that whoever tasted the meat of that steer or that heifer would give thanks too.

Nabhan-Warren’s discussion of the factory’s blood, guts and stench is heartbreaking, but his assessment of its workers – white, Latino, Congolese, Vietnamese – is inspiring. The workers “look like ninja warriors of the meat – sawing, slicing, cutting and packing to precise and clean measurements.” In particular, it corrects the idea that the conditioning of meat is “unskilled labor”. “This is highly skilled work,” she says. It is also very hard work. “Most of the professional white-collar women and men I know,” she notes, “would have a hard time doing the work that is done in factories like IPB. It’s a shame that many Americans don’t like and appreciate the immigrants and refugees who do this hard work.

Nabhan-Warren also spent time visiting churches in rural Iowa. She attended St. Joseph’s Parish in Columbus Junction for a year. This is a snapshot of Catholic parishes in many parts of the country: a decreasing number of worshipers at Mass in English and a booming crowd at Mass in Spanish. Joseph Sia, an American priest of Filipino descent, chairs the two groups, which rarely intermingle. (One of my favorite details in the book is about a white American priest, Bernie Weir, who, after struggling to communicate with his Spanish-speaking parishioners, spent two weeks at a language school in Guadalajara run by the Sisters of humility). Latino Catholics are the salvation of these parishes, but salvation sometimes feels like a displacement for white parishioners who were themselves religious outsiders in largely Protestant communities.

But Nabhan-Warren also finds and analyzes religion outside of church buildings. It is in the homes of Latino refugees who pray to Our Lady for the safety of their families. It’s in a small corner of a meat-packing factory where two Sudanese women lay their prayer rugs five times a day – when supervisors allow – and turn “a horrible place into a beautiful place.” She also attends the evangelical ‘servant leadership’ and paternalism talk embraced by the Meat Wrapper leadership, where CEOs, supervisors and chaplains urge their employees to ‘celebrate their faith’ at work. She portrays Joe Blay, a Congo-born AME chaplain at Tyson Fresh Meats in Columbus Junction. Tyson employs 115 chaplains in his many factories, who “work hard to make a place that is deeply profane… a place that is sacred”.

At the beginning of Meatpacking America, Nabhan-Warren shares that her book “began as a focus on White Catholics and Latino Catholics and has grown into a more complex and complex story of women and men seeking refuge in Iowa.” Yet I wonder how an ethnography of Corn Belt evangelism would be both similar and different from the largely Catholic stories it tells. Do Evangelical White Iowans have different views on immigrants and refugees than their White Catholic counterparts? Nabhan-Warren spent time in parishes in which white and Spanish-speaking parishioners shared buildings, even though they attended separate masses. How often do white and Latino – or African – evangelicals share sacred spaces? Or worship together?

Meatpacking America ends with the author’s fervent hope “that we may come to a point in our country where whites are not only becoming tolerant or even comfortable with the new demographic realities, but accepting the new American pluralism and all the beauty and the joy it brings to our communities. The communities where refugees live owe much of their prosperity to the hard work these women and men do for rural America and America’s economies. Instead of vilifying them, we should be grateful for their presence and for the many ways in which they enrich our places of worship, our schools and the community at large. Amen.


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English Montreal School Board revokes declaration denying Quebec’s national identity https://scuolainsieme.com/english-montreal-school-board-revokes-declaration-denying-quebecs-national-identity/ https://scuolainsieme.com/english-montreal-school-board-revokes-declaration-denying-quebecs-national-identity/#respond Sat, 11 Sep 2021 20:37:35 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/english-montreal-school-board-revokes-declaration-denying-quebecs-national-identity/ MONTREAL – Earlier this week, the English Montreal School Board [EMSB] published a document in which he denied the national identity of Quebec, sparking outrage from the Bloc Quebecois. Now the EMSB has voted to withdraw the declaration. “The Council wishes to recognize that it now recognizes that some of these criticisms were unfounded or […]]]>

MONTREAL – Earlier this week, the English Montreal School Board [EMSB] published a document in which he denied the national identity of Quebec, sparking outrage from the Bloc Quebecois.

Now the EMSB has voted to withdraw the declaration.

“The Council wishes to recognize that it now recognizes that some of these criticisms were unfounded or erroneous,” read a statement. “In particular, the EMSB does not question the fact that Quebec forms a nation.

On September 7, the EMSB released a document outlining its opposition to Bill 96. It expressed particular concern about the impact the bill could have on the English-speaking community of Quebec.

But one clause dealt with the status of Quebec as a nation, declaring that “the intelligentsia of Quebec deliberately misuses the word ‘nation’ to imply a reality that only exists in its mirage of itself.”

The offending clause is now deleted, but criticism of language issues will remain.

EMSB president Joe Ortona said the resolution’s main purpose was not to deny Quebec’s national identity, but to implore the government to withdraw Bill 96.

“The purpose of the resolution was to highlight the concerns we have with regard to Bill 96 and to affirm that it is not necessary to promote and protect the French language.

But according to the cabinet of Simon Jolin-Barrette, Minister responsible for the French language, “the damage is already done”.

“The comments made by the EMSB last week were contemptuous and unacceptable,” read a statement. “Quebec denigration has no place and must stop.

The declaration defended Bill 96, asserting that it “aims to ensure the sustainability of French in Quebec, while respecting the rights of English-speaking institutions”.


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Parents in British Columbia demand better access to French education online – Vernon Morning Star https://scuolainsieme.com/parents-in-british-columbia-demand-better-access-to-french-education-online-vernon-morning-star/ https://scuolainsieme.com/parents-in-british-columbia-demand-better-access-to-french-education-online-vernon-morning-star/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 22:37:00 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/parents-in-british-columbia-demand-better-access-to-french-education-online-vernon-morning-star/ Parents of French immersion students in British Columbia are asking the province to do more to ensure access to education in French for the 2021/22 school year. French immersion enrollments fell for the first time in 20 years as classes disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic. The Education Department attributed the drop to the loss of […]]]>

Parents of French immersion students in British Columbia are asking the province to do more to ensure access to education in French for the 2021/22 school year.

French immersion enrollments fell for the first time in 20 years as classes disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic. The Education Department attributed the drop to the loss of non-resident students, but parents say online programs for French were “grossly insufficient.”

“When COVID first hit, there were a lot of parents looking for online courses in French – mostly at the college and high school level – and those courses just didn’t exist,” said Glyn Lewis , Executive Director of Canadian Parents for French BC. & Yukon. “This highlighted that there is an inequality within our education system between online English lessons and online French lessons.”

The group calls on the province to ensure that French learners will no longer be left behind in the 2021/22 school year. But that decision is up to each school board.

In a statement, the Education Department said French immersion students can take online programs offered by districts outside the catchment area and schools are expected to provide information to parents on the number. options available to meet the needs of their students.

But Lewis said if parents want to ensure access to French programs, they will have to demand them locally.

“The most important thing parents need to do is speak up, be active in their communities, and lobby for these programs to make sure they are available and well supported.

Over 53,500 students are enrolled in French immersion, which represents approximately 9.4% of all students in British Columbia.


@SchislerCole
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Dear Gavin Williamson, now we know what your plans are for Covid-safe classrooms … uh, uh | Michael rosen https://scuolainsieme.com/dear-gavin-williamson-now-we-know-what-your-plans-are-for-covid-safe-classrooms-uh-uh-michael-rosen/ https://scuolainsieme.com/dear-gavin-williamson-now-we-know-what-your-plans-are-for-covid-safe-classrooms-uh-uh-michael-rosen/#respond Sat, 04 Sep 2021 16:45:00 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/dear-gavin-williamson-now-we-know-what-your-plans-are-for-covid-safe-classrooms-uh-uh-michael-rosen/ I I wonder if you watched your BBC Breakfast car crash interview with Charlie Stayt this week? He set before you a scenario that teachers entering the new term may well face during the pandemic: a room in a school, without a window. In this room, as Stayt reminded you, is a teacher and students. […]]]>

I I wonder if you watched your BBC Breakfast car crash interview with Charlie Stayt this week? He set before you a scenario that teachers entering the new term may well face during the pandemic: a room in a school, without a window. In this room, as Stayt reminded you, is a teacher and students. You did not suggest that this situation would not take place. I know why: Over the years, schools have had to improvise for space with all kinds of alcoves, partitions and nooks, dividing the rooms so that small group teaching can take place. Sometimes these teaching spaces do not have windows. There were times when I did writing workshops in such places. I know they exist. I think you also.

Once Stayt put this picture in front of you – a room with no windows, no ventilation, as he put it – he asked: what should this professor do?

Here’s what you said: “Well, uh, as you well know, uh, we’re taking a whole bunch of things and of course that’s why the immunization program is a key reason -“

Charlie asked his question again, and you continued without a problem, “As you will understand, you know, uh, you know, we’re always looking to improve the type of security; the kind of, uh, that reasonable balance of getting kids back to school and also dealing with uh, uh, all sort of, uh, global pandemic. “

Gavin Williamson took the tongue out in BBC Covid and Schools interview - video
Gavin Williamson took the tongue out in BBC Covid and Schools interview – video

Like thousands of others, I have a child who is going back to school. As I read this, I wonder if Mr. Williamson answered Charlie Stayt’s question? Did he reassure me that when my child goes to school, the Secretary of State for Education in England has issued guidelines for staff and students on what to do to stay safe, in that windowless, ventilated room? As I was transcribing what you were saying, I was concentrating very intensely on your exact sentences to see if I could find any reason to be confident in your plans. I’m going to lead them by you: “whole set of measures”, “the kind of security”, “the reasonable balance”, “all sort of, uh, global pandemic”.

I know that you and your colleague Nick Gibb, the Minister for Educational Standards, attach great importance to the correct and precise use of the language. In fact, you have set up tests to measure how correct and accurate children’s language use is. Teachers are also assessed on how well they can teach this. I guess you and Gibb would like to give teachers and students some good examples of how to produce that kind of language as well. In its own way, those words, “all sort of, uh, global pandemic” make up a “broad noun phrase,” which your program considers a hallmark of good writing. However, while this is one of those much-loved constructs, in your response to Stayt on ventilation in classrooms in England, that broad noun phrase doesn’t help me at all. It gave me no reason why I or my child should be confident that they won’t be exposed to virus-spreading situations at school.

Airborne viruses do not discriminate on the basis of age, sex, gender or any other category. We breathe them out, we breathe them in. A person infected with the virus, who may or may not feel sick, can send the virus into the air. Someone who does not have the virus can breathe this air. I can be just as worried that my own child is in ‘this room’, as I can be worried about whether they might breathe out the virus on someone who might get seriously ill, become long Covid, or die.

Back to Stayt’s question. Instead of struggling with political gibberish, how would you have responded otherwise? The Covid is no longer a surprise. There could have been – and still could be – an emergency program for schools to improve ventilation. You could produce a set of clear guidelines on what types of spaces should not be used by more than one person at one time. And you could produce a clear set of mask guidelines. Students are told to wear masks on buses on their way to their school, where they then sit in bus-like classrooms and remove their masks. What is the policy?

So Stayt asked you: if there is no ventilation in “this room”, would there be a CO2 to watch? And you have embarked on another painful ramble on “deployment”. It is the deployment that did not take place.

It’s not okay, Mr. Williamson. It’s chaotic and dangerous. Your elusive answers reveal that you and this government don’t know what to do, or that you don’t want to do what needs to be done. To me, it sounds to me like you think you can get away with the lethal ‘herd immunity’ strategy again, hoping the vaccination will help you avoid the monster death toll we had in 2020. This times, it’s our kids and their teachers that you’re experimenting with, facing the uh, uh, all sort of, uh, global pandemic.

Yours, Michael Rosen


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Barrow Neurological Institute Javier Cardenas Christian Kirk https://scuolainsieme.com/barrow-neurological-institute-javier-cardenas-christian-kirk/ https://scuolainsieme.com/barrow-neurological-institute-javier-cardenas-christian-kirk/#respond Thu, 02 Sep 2021 02:14:44 +0000 https://scuolainsieme.com/barrow-neurological-institute-javier-cardenas-christian-kirk/ As more Arizona parents are more educated about concussions, more and more are deciding to say no to the sport that arguably creates the greatest risk of head injury, high school football. In the most recent Barrow Neurological Institute survey, the number of parents allowing their children to play football increased from 68% in 2016 […]]]>

As more Arizona parents are more educated about concussions, more and more are deciding to say no to the sport that arguably creates the greatest risk of head injury, high school football.

In the most recent Barrow Neurological Institute survey, the number of parents allowing their children to play football increased from 68% in 2016 to 47% in 2020, according to Dr Javier Cardenas, director of the Barrow Concussion and Brain Injury Center at Barrow Neurological. Institute.

The Barrow Neurological Institute, located in north Phoenix, on Tuesday celebrated its 10th anniversary of the nation’s first mandatory concussion training for student-athletes.

Barrow, the Arizona Interscholastic Association, and the Arizona Cardinals collaborated to create the Barrow Brainbook, which has trained over a million high school athletes in multiple sports since its inception.

“Mental health, a disease of the brain, is the most important issue for our athletes today,” Cardenas said at a press conference on Wednesday. “Arizona has been and will continue to be the leader in concussion initiatives, nationally and internationally.

Part of the declining number of parents allowing their children to play football could be due to misconceptions about concussions, which gained more attention after reports of many former NFL players suffering from brain disorders linked to injuries. injuries later in life.

“The biggest misconception I hear about concussion is that it’s not treatable and you have to go to a dark room and rest and stay there forever. It’s not.” , Cardenas said. “In fact, there are many active treatments, mostly non-drug, that can help people recover, whether it’s vestibular therapy for balance, occupational therapy for vision … All of these treatments are treatment opportunities. “

Improving prevention measures is also essential, he said.

Penalties are now applied to head-to-head contact games, such as targeting and blind blocks, which cause the most concussions. In addition, football players wear equipment that better prevents head injuries.

“I think the only thing that [NFL players] we have technology on our side, ”said Cardinals wide receiver Christian Kirk, a Saguaro High School product, who attended Wednesday’s press conference. “The technology that we have in our helmets and all of our gear to help us stay safe, as well as to help eliminate some of those traumatic injuries that have been suffered in the past.”

However, the effects of this new technology are not only felt at the professional level.

“In fact, at the NFL level, almost every athlete wears the best performing helmet. Why does it matter? It matters because this technology is impacting our varsity athletes and, more importantly, our youth. athletes, ”Cardenas said.

While at Saguaro, Kirk was a member of the group that participated in the Barrow Neurological Institute’s first collaboration and the launch of the Barrow Brainbook program. Following the program enabled her to recognize the symptoms of a concussion.

If athletes suffer from a head injury, the Barrow Brainbook requires them to take a concussion education course and take a formal test to participate in Arizona high school sports. So far, over 300,000 high school athletes have completed these tests and over 600,000 have completed the Barrow Neurological Institute’s Telemedicine Concussion Program.

The Barrow Brainbook’s reach continues to grow after Cardenas said a Spanish version was just released.

“This Spanish Brainbook will allow us to better serve our Latino community in Arizona, as well as improve accessibility for all Spanish speaking student-athletes,” Cardenas said.


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