Italian professor – Scuola Insieme http://www.scuolainsieme.com/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 16:05:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T191058.566-150x150.png Italian professor – Scuola Insieme http://www.scuolainsieme.com/ 32 32 UBC climate experts and delegates to COP26 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/ubc-climate-experts-and-delegates-to-cop26/ https://www.scuolainsieme.com/ubc-climate-experts-and-delegates-to-cop26/#respond Thu, 21 Oct 2021 15:00:17 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/ubc-climate-experts-and-delegates-to-cop26/ The 26th Conference of the Parties (COP26) on climate change will take place from October 31 to November 12. UBC conference delegates as well as UBC climate, environment and sustainability experts are available for comment. UBC COP26 delegation Juan José Allava (he him)Research associate, Institute of Oceans and Fisheries Faculty of ScienceEmail: j.alava@oceans.ubc.caLanguage (s) of […]]]>

The 26th Conference of the Parties (COP26) on climate change will take place from October 31 to November 12. UBC conference delegates as well as UBC climate, environment and sustainability experts are available for comment.

UBC COP26 delegation

Juan José Allava (he him)
Research associate, Institute of Oceans and Fisheries Faculty of Science
Email: j.alava@oceans.ubc.ca
Language (s) of the interview: English and Spanish

  • Climate change and ocean pollution (bioaccumulation of pollutants in the food web exacerbated by climate change) with risk implications and equity considerations on coastal communities.

Eman Alsulaiti (إيمان السليطي) (she she)
Undergraduate student, Department of Central, Eastern and Northern European Studies
Email: eeman@student.ubc.ca
Language (s) of the interview: English, Arabic, Portuguese, Spanish

  • Sustainable Development Goal 4
  • European Green Agreement, Qatar, youth empowerment, sustainability

Max Cohen (he him)
PhD student, Department of Geography
Phone. : 778-887-7362
Email: max.cohen.ubc@gmail.com
Language (s) of the interview: English

  • Just transition, climate policy and Glasgow

Dr Robert Godin (he him)
Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry
Email: robert.godin@ubc.ca
Language (s) of the interview: English, French

  • Energy, especially solar energy
  • Use of carbon dioxide, sustainability and water purification

Prof. Kathryn Harrison (she she)
Professor, Department of Political Science
Phone. : 778-968-4923
Email: kathryn.harrison@ubc.ca
Language (s) of the interview: English

  • Climate and energy, climate change
  • Environmental policy, environmental policy

Dr Walter Mérida (he him)
Senior Faculty Advisor to the President and Vice-Chancellor,
Associate Dean, Research and Industrial Partnerships, Faculty of Applied Sciences,
Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering
Phone. : 604-822-4189
Email: walter.merida@ubc.ca
Language (s) of the interview: English, Spanish, Italian

  • UBC sustainability research and initiatives
  • Clean Energy Opportunities for British Columbia
  • Sustainable energy systems, low carbon fuels, hydrogen and clean energy

Témitope Onifade (he him)
PhD Candidate, Peter A. Allard School of Law
Email: temitope@onifade.org
Language (s) of the interview: English, Yoruba, Pidgin in English

  • Climate policy and justice under the Paris Agreement
  • Canada’s climate governance framework

Dr U. Rashid Sumaila (he him)
Professor at Killam University, Institute of Oceans and Fisheries and School of Public Policy and Global Affairs
Phone. : 604-351-7406
Email: r.sumaila@oceans.ubc.ca
Interview language (s): English, Hausa, Norwegian

  • Blue economy, sustainable and fair ocean systems, fisheries economics
  • Marine biodiversity, ocean conservation

Juvarya Veltkamp (she she)
Director, Canadian Climate Law Initiative
Email: veltkamp@allard.ubc.ca
Interview language (s): English, Urdu, Hindi

  • Climate change, climate risk, green economy, net zero transition
  • Sustainable cities, green buildings, economic development, governance / climate law

Climate / environment

Teacher. Werner Antweiler
Associate Professor, Sauder School of Business
Phone. : 604-822-8484
Email: werner.antweiler@ubc.ca
Language (s) of the interview: English

  • Environmental and energy topics, in particular the integration of renewable energies in our electricity network and the electrification of mobility

Dr Peter Arcese
Professor, Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences
Phone. : 778-350-9295
Email: peter.arcese@ubc.ca
Language (s) of the interview: English

  • Uses advanced computer planning tools and global citizen science and space data to design conservation plans capable of enhancing biodiversity restoration, atmospheric carbon sequestration, and improved local livelihoods

Dr Kai Chan (he him)
Professor, Institute of Resources, Environment and Sustainability
Canada Research Chair in Rewilding and Socio-Ecological Transformation
E-mail: kaichan@ires.ubc.ca
Language (s) of the interview: English

  • Social and economic transitions and transformations
  • Relationships between climate change, water, food, biodiversity

Dr William Cheung
Professor, Institute of Oceans and Fisheries
Canada Research Chair in Ocean Sustainability and Global Change
Email: w.cheung@oceans.ubc.ca
Language (s) of the interview: English

  • Biodiversity
  • Impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems and dependent human communities
  • Climate solutions for ocean and fishing

Dr Simon Donner
Professor, Department of Geography
Email: simon.donner@ubc.ca
Language (s) of the interview: English

  • Climate change science and politics
  • International climate finance
  • Emissions targets

* Not available from October 22 to 23

Dr Johan Foster
Professor, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
NSERC Canfor Industrial Research Chair in Advanced Bioproducts
Email: johan.foster@ubc.ca
Phone. : 604-817-8882
Language (s) of the interview: English

  • Renewable plastics, biodegradable plastics
  • Carbon neutral and carbon negative materials

Dr John S. Richardson
Professor, Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences
Email: john.richardson@ubc.ca
Language (s) of the interview: English

Dr Stephen Sheppard (he him)
Professor, Department of Forest Resources Management
Phone. : 778-997-7292
Email: stephen.sheppard@ubc.ca
Language (s) of the interview: English

  • Climate change planning and engagement; visualization; urban forestry, nature-based solutions and renewable energies; mitigation and adaptation

* Not available on the morning of October 22 and October 28-29

Dr Terry Sunderland
Professor, Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences
Phone. : 778-871-6483
E-mail: terry.sunderland@ubc.ca
Language (s) of the interview: English

  • Coordination of the World Landscapes Forum at the COP, from 5 to 7 November
  • Sustainable development, forests, food security, landscape approaches, livelihoods, biodiversity

Dr Philippe Tortell (he him)
Professor, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
Email: ptortell@eoas.ubc.ca
Language (s) of the interview: English

  • How Earth’s Environment Has Changed Due To Human Impact Over The Past 50 Years
  • Greenhouse gas

Dr Jiaying Zhao (she she)
Associate Professor, Department of Psychology
Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability
Canada Research Chair in Sustainable Behavior Development
Phone. : 609-865-4765
Email: jiayingz@psych.ubc.ca
Language (s) of the interview: English, Chinese


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Italian campaign of the First World War, the battles of the Alpine front revisited | Item https://www.scuolainsieme.com/italian-campaign-of-the-first-world-war-the-battles-of-the-alpine-front-revisited-item/ https://www.scuolainsieme.com/italian-campaign-of-the-first-world-war-the-battles-of-the-alpine-front-revisited-item/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 09:13:14 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/italian-campaign-of-the-first-world-war-the-battles-of-the-alpine-front-revisited-item/ 1/2 Show legend + Hide caption – Italian retired Brig. Gen. Edoardo Maggian, center, gives a landscape orientation atop Monte Grappa in Crespano del Grappa, Italy, during a U.S. Army Task Force on Southern Europe – Africa G4 on 25 September 2021. SETAF-AF G4 led a two-day tour focusing on the Italian military campaign during […]]]>








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Italian retired Brig. Gen. Edoardo Maggian, center, gives a landscape orientation atop Monte Grappa in Crespano del Grappa, Italy, during a U.S. Army Task Force on Southern Europe – Africa G4 on 25 September 2021. SETAF-AF G4 led a two-day tour focusing on the Italian military campaign during WWI; the event ended with a trek on Monte Grappa, where the Italian army fought three decisive battles against German and Austro-Hungarian forces in 1917-18.
(Photo credit: courtesy photo)

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Col. Scott P. Noon, US Army Southern European Task Force, Africa G4 logistics director, right, and Col. Michele Biasiutti, US Army Garrison Italy Italian senior officer, second from right, salute during a wreath laying ceremony at the Monte Grappa military memorial in Crespano del Grappa, Italy on September 25, 2021. SETAF-AF G4 conducted a staff walk focusing on the Italian military campaign in WWI global;  the event ended with a trek on Monte Grappa, where the Italian army fought three decisive battles against German and Austro-Hungarian forces in 1917-18.








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Col. Scott P. Noon, US Army Southern European Task Force, Africa G4 logistics director, right, and Col. Michele Biasiutti, US Army Garrison Italy Italian senior officer, second from right, salute during a wreath laying ceremony at the Monte Grappa military memorial in Crespano del Grappa, Italy on September 25, 2021. SETAF-AF G4 conducted a staff walk focusing on the Italian military campaign in WWI global; the event ended with a trek on Monte Grappa, where the Italian army fought three decisive battles against German and Austro-Hungarian forces in 1917-18.
(Photo credit: courtesy photo)

SEE THE ORIGINAL

VICENCE, Italy – Soldiers and staff from the US Army’s Task Force Southern Europe-Africa G4 leadership recently participated in a combat staff tour and educational forum designed to foster professional development of leaders of the United States Army and increase their knowledge of Italy and the Italian front during WWI. .

The two-day combat personnel hike, which took place on September 24-25, began with an educational forum at the Hall of Heroes in Caserma Ederle, Vicenza, and ended with a hike on and around the memorial military and the summit of Monte Grappa. .

U.S. Army Col. Scott P. Noon, SETAF-AF, Deputy Chief of Staff, G4, Director of Logistics, hosted the two-day event to support building staff cohesion and educating G4 soldiers and civilians on the Italian campaign in the First World War, and on the lessons learned from the battles of the Italian army at Monte Grappa.

“The First World War provided us with many lessons learned at the tactical and operational levels,” Noon said. “Specific to the struggle on the Italo-Alpine front, the Italian forces were confronted with logistical challenges that still appear in our army today. In addition to battling the high altitude and harsh winter conditions of the Italian Alps, Italian forces addressed issues of mission command, communications, integration and logistics.

To underline the strategic importance of the Monte Grappa massif during World War I, the G4 used the expertise of the senior Italian officer in the US Army garrison, Colonel Michele Biasiutti, retired Italian brigadier. General Edoardo Maggian and Italian author and military historian Professor Paolo Pozzato.

During the educational forum, Pozzato shared a personal collection of illustrated narratives presenting the experiences of the forces on the Italian front and provided a socio-historical perspective contextualizing the geopolitical climate of Italy before the war.

Likewise, during the hike, Biasiutti and Maggian provided an overview of Italy’s military strategy, putting in context the key strategic and operational aspects of the war and the strategic importance of the Grappa massif as a line. final defense for Italy.

The three host nation experts discussed the factors of homeland defense and how a series of battles on the Italian-Austrian border would ultimately lead to Italy’s redemptive victory over German and Austro-Hungarian forces.

“Facing the current COVID environment, this staff race had been in the works for a year,” Noon said. “A lot of hard work and tactical patience went into planning and executing this hike. “

In addition to her experience as a senior personnel route planner, U.S. Army 1st Lt. Moriah Edwards, G4 logistics planning officer, said she enjoys her interactions with leaders. Italian military and academics.

“Planning this staff hike has been a great learning experience and quite a unique opportunity for me,” she said. “I was honored to have gained the confidence and direct access to plan this event alongside Colonel Biasiutti and his Director General, Lieutenant-Colonel Tesseri Tomasso. This staff walk was a huge success due to the invaluable contributions of our host country experts and the interoperability between American and Italian planners. “

To learn more about the US Army Southern European Task Force – Africa: https://www.setaf-africa.army.mil/

Follow SETAF – AF on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SETAFAfrica


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Heritage talks about the hope for a revival of Italian restaurants | Calcutta News https://www.scuolainsieme.com/heritage-talks-about-the-hope-for-a-revival-of-italian-restaurants-calcutta-news/ https://www.scuolainsieme.com/heritage-talks-about-the-hope-for-a-revival-of-italian-restaurants-calcutta-news/#respond Mon, 18 Oct 2021 22:56:00 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/heritage-talks-about-the-hope-for-a-revival-of-italian-restaurants-calcutta-news/ Calcutta: The resurrection of Restaurant Peliti, which was once an iconic Italian restaurant on Old Court House Street, opposite the Governor’s House, could be the starting point for long-term cooperation between Bengal and Italy in heritage regeneration in Calcutta. City Police Chief Soumen Mitra, who has been instrumental in the restoration of many police heritage […]]]>
Calcutta: The resurrection of Restaurant Peliti, which was once an iconic Italian restaurant on Old Court House Street, opposite the Governor’s House, could be the starting point for long-term cooperation between Bengal and Italy in heritage regeneration in Calcutta. City Police Chief Soumen Mitra, who has been instrumental in the restoration of many police heritage buildings, has shown keen interest in participating in the rebirth of a precious piece of cosmopolitan history of the city at a heritage conservation event in the city on Monday.
Vincenzo de Luca, Ambassador of Italy, said: “The restoration of Peliti can be a good starting point for Bengal-Italy cooperation in the regeneration of the city’s heritage which should involve a movement involving stakeholders from different institutions. as happened in the heritage movement. in cities like Bologna and Naples. Mitra quickly ensured active cooperation in the restoration and preservation of these buildings.
Earlier, Professor Tathagata Chatterjee, an expert in urban management and governance, set the tone for the symposium at the Bengal Chamber of Commerce by mentioning Peliti to refer to Kolkata’s long connection with Italy. He also referred to the Italian architectural influence on the colonial buildings in the city.
The knight Federico Peliti, a master chef, started his catering and confectionery business in 1870. Famous for the three-course lunch, the restaurant was also known for the 12-foot-tall replica of the sugar Eiffel Tower, designed by Peliti himself in December 1889. It is here that the Rotary Club of Calcutta was born in 1919. The building is now in ruins and needs urgent restoration. Luca promised to share the famous Italian experience and expertise in the process of heritage regeneration.
Mitra, Manish Chakraborty, a conservation architect, and GM Kapur, the Bengal official of INTACH, all advocated for the transfer of the Development Right (TDR) to the state to save more and more heritage buildings, which have become the responsibility of the owners. In fact, the state government is also very keen to incorporate TDR into the construction law.


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Relationship between CO2 and geothermal energy in Tuscany https://www.scuolainsieme.com/relationship-between-co2-and-geothermal-energy-in-tuscany/ https://www.scuolainsieme.com/relationship-between-co2-and-geothermal-energy-in-tuscany/#respond Sun, 17 Oct 2021 23:27:27 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/relationship-between-co2-and-geothermal-energy-in-tuscany/ Enel Green Power’s Sasso 2 geothermal power station, Tuscany, Italy (source: Volcanex) It is crucial to trust science and research and not incorrect information that has slowed down the development of geothermal energy as a valuable energy resource for Italy, a new study has therefore published. Three new studies, published by Italian researchers – with […]]]>

Enel Green Power’s Sasso 2 geothermal power station, Tuscany, Italy (source: Volcanex)

It is crucial to trust science and research and not incorrect information that has slowed down the development of geothermal energy as a valuable energy resource for Italy, a new study has therefore published.

Three new studies, published by Italian researchers – with a leading role from the University of Pisa – in prestigious international journals are finally helping to shed light on a subject that has been controversial for too long: what relationship is there between the industrial culture of geothermal energy and CO2 emissions into the atmosphere? This question is addressed in a recent Greenreport article earlier this month. This renewable source has always been naturally present in Tuscany, the first territory in the world that managed to tame it more than a century ago, achieving extraordinary results.

Today, more than 70% of the electricity we consume from renewable sources is guaranteed, in Tuscany, by geothermal energy: in other words, the heat of the earth covers a third of all our electricity needs and directly supplies energy. ‘significant amounts of heat.

Yet doubts have always remained about the climate-altering emissions associated with geothermal power plants. Pollutant emissions are regularly checked by the competent authorities (mainly ARPAT) certifying constant compliance with the regulations in force. But what about CO2? Do power plant discharges replace natural soil emissions or are they additional?

The new studies published after years of intense research directly in the field finally paint a precise picture, both for the region of Larderello and for the region of Amiata. We spoke about it directly with Alessandro Sbrana, professor in the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Pisa and co-author of the research in question.

The use of geothermal energy for industrial purposes began for the first time in Tuscany: a world record that makes it difficult to assess the effects of geothermal generation on parameters such as CO2 emissions, given the lack of reliable data on the relative soil degassing. over two centuries ago. New study uses historical data on boric acid production as an indicator: How can we estimate past CO2 emissions?

“The authors of the work published in the journal Energies made it possible to estimate the CO2 emissions before the geothermal generation at Larderello, starting with the production of boric acid extracted in 1800 and at the beginning of the 20th century in the so-called “lagoons”, which gradually disappeared in the first years of the ‘900, when the condensation of geothermal vapors took place.

In the lagoons, the condensation of the vapor rich in boron, an element similar to the vapor phase, caused the precipitation of a solid phase of boric acid (H3BO3) in the condensation water of the lagoons which was then extracted; the quantities of ore extracted were recorded in the archives of the mining industry of the time. Data on the amount of boron extracted provided an estimate of the amount of steam that escaped from geothermal reservoirs during the period considered.

This is the starting point that was used for estimating CO2 emissions before the industrial development of geothermal energy. The measurement of the ratio between CO2 and water vapor, measured by Payen at Larderello in 1841, and the knowledge of the concentration of boron in the vapor made it possible to calculate the quantity of incondensable gas, the CO2 emitted during the period of extraction of boron in Boraciferous Lagoni of Larderello between 1818 and 1867 from tons of boric acid.

This estimate is the only and valuable indication of the amount of steam and gas that was released into the atmosphere prior to the cultivation of current geothermal fields. It is obviously limited to the area of ​​major natural manifestations of the Devil’s Valley, which have now almost disappeared, replaced by gaseous emissions and mineralized thermal aquifers in various places in the Valley.

The results of this research published in a special volume of Energies , a prestigious international multidisciplinary journal dedicated to energy, provides the first quantitative indication of the quantity of greenhouse gases (CO2) and vapor naturally released into the atmosphere.

It is estimated that in the Valle del Diavolo there was a natural steam emission for about 236 t / h with 17 t / h of CO2 associated, which in terms of geothermal power plant corresponds to a power plant of 130-140 MW. Today, the flow of steam and gas in the Devil’s Valley is extremely reduced under the effect of more than a century of geothermal generation, which is still cultivated while maintaining the reservoirs in equilibrium ”.

The article ends with an overview of the best technological solutions to date for cultivating geothermal fluids in an increasingly sustainable way, both in terms of electricity and heat production.

… And in the Italian context, the article underlines that “in the case of geothermal energy, we must trust science and research and offer the inhabitants of the region the results obtained which respond to the erroneous information that has unfortunately slowed down the development of this precious energy resource. … there is not much to add

For the full article, see the link below (in Italian).

Source: Green report


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THE DANTE PROJECT, Royal Opera https://www.scuolainsieme.com/the-dante-project-royal-opera/ https://www.scuolainsieme.com/the-dante-project-royal-opera/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 11:24:36 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/the-dante-project-royal-opera/ It is often said that Dante Alighieri is the Italian William Shakspeare, and he certainly is in many ways. Often photographed on his side – with a prominent nose, a laurel wreath and a red tunic becoming the stars of his portraits – he somewhat invented the Italian language even before modern Italy was conceived […]]]>

BWW Review: THE DANTE PROJECT, Royal OperaIt is often said that Dante Alighieri is the Italian William Shakspeare, and he certainly is in many ways. Often photographed on his side – with a prominent nose, a laurel wreath and a red tunic becoming the stars of his portraits – he somewhat invented the Italian language even before modern Italy was conceived of as an ideal. The English would not meet their bard for two more centuries.

To celebrate the 700th anniversary of Dante’s death, a new ballet inspired by his Divina Commedia, Divine comedy, has its world premiere on the stage of the Royal Opera House. A collaboration between the Royal Ballet and the Los Angeles Philharmonic, The Dante project is choreographed by Wayne McGregor, composed by Thomas Adès and designed by Tacita Dean, while lighting design is by Lucy Carter and Simon Bennison with dramaturgy curated by Uzma Hameed.

Overall, the production looks and sounds magnificent as in its attempt to translate a body of work defined as an “allegorical and didactic poem” to dance. Divided into three “cantiche” (three parts), it details Dante’s journey through hell, purgatory and finally paradise.

Written during his forced exile from his beloved Florence, the poem is imbued with longing for his hometown, harbors a plethora of glorious allegories, and sees a great number of famous figures arise here and there (those in hell are the more surprising). It’s also an inherently political piece and removing that element – as it is here – does a colossal service to both the audience and the material.

As my old Italian teacher would say (she idolized Alighieri and equated him to her god – I know) when someone quoted him badly or worse, “Dante rolls in his grave”. But she’s not in this conversation, and she isn’t. It is important to keep in mind that The Dante project is a ballet little influenced by the original poem. The end result at McGregor’s helm is visually dazzling and impressive Comedy– infused show.

Unfortunately, none of the particular characters we find in Alighieri’s material are presented correctly, and sinners in particular all become one with very little distinction between them. This makes it a huge feat for Dante-laity and those not too familiar with the text. Against a large upside-down mountain range sketched on black, penitents wear dark coveralls, white chalk stains their bodies in specific parts loosely related to their sins (Paolo – by Paolo and Francesca fame, The Forbidden Lovers – has it through his groin, for example), while Edward Watson’s Dante watches.

He is both strangely drawn to the frenzy of sins and overwhelmed by a deep sadness to see their suffering. Particularly noteworthy is the Suicide Forest – Dido (and probably one of the more immediate parts). The company is breathtaking, following haunting, thunderous music as it waves to them before slowly transforming into soft and nostalgic.

As in the book, Dante is seen fainting a few times – which was a particularly whimsical detail to spot given the circumstances. In the Comedy, he passed out several times, overwhelmed by emotions, fear or fatigue. It was a clever evasion that made it easier for Alighieri to move his alter ego from circle to circle without much explanation. Once or twice Virgil is described as carrying it heroically, thus forming one of the very first healthy bromances.

It comes out in a fine and charming way at the end of McGregor’s Purgatorio: Love. It is time for Virgil de Gary Avis to bid farewell to his passing companion and return to his friends the “spiriti magni” (noble souls). They are artists, philosophers and authors born before the birth of Christ. Oddly enough, Dante should have put them among the heretics and tortured them, but since he was a huge fan of them, they end up in a special shining castle outside of Hell.

The last farewell of Virgil and Dante becomes tender movements, a physical and tender farewell at the end of the second act. This one is remarkably different from the first. Dean’s use of color and color differences between souls alludes to the hierarchy of souls. Purgatory is a place characterized by penance and waiting to be welcomed in Paradise.

Souls make their way to the white suits in the final act, which are still stained but fade here. Dante and Virgil become the few intense spots among the subdued hues. A large square backdrop dominates the stage while short stools to its left allude to the waiting element of the place. This act features weird Arab-sounding examples that tip the scales of work as it seems inappropriate and unwarranted.

Watson is however fascinating when he takes the stage alone. A sinner in need of repentance, he pays his due with his comrades until he is finally met by Sarah Lamb’s Beatrice – the love of his life, whom we saw briefly outside the gates of the hell. She escorts him to paradise, where The Dante project finalizes his detachment from Alighieri.

If Purgatory could still be somewhat attached to his poem even though very few events taking place there are present in the ballet, Heaven feels a completely different and separate piece. A more classic stage is now installed, with a rectangular screen suspended above the dancers’ heads.

The projections are both distracting from the leaf talent happening below, and confusing as to their relevance. Pure white and colors blend together here, with Watson now wearing Dante’s famous red robe (gone blue in Hell and half-and-half in Purgatory). While all narrative is missing, this final act is magnificent. With all the tension of torture and the need to reunite with Beatrice from the previous parts, it turns into pure heavenly dance entertainment. Paradiso: Poema Sacro is flashy and bewitching, sweet and jubilant, a feast for the eyes.

In all, The Dante project is an ambitious enterprise that could never have matched the grandeur and magnificence of the Comedy. It is, however, a clever introduction to related material with impeccable visuals and amazing talent. Dante’s universe has been the source of all kinds of media, from plays to video games. It’s complex, compelling and magnetic. Maybe even more than Shakespeare’s world …

The Dante Project runs at the Royal Opera House until October 30.

Photo credit: Andrej Uspenski


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Widespread masking causes people to follow the crowd https://www.scuolainsieme.com/widespread-masking-causes-people-to-follow-the-crowd/ https://www.scuolainsieme.com/widespread-masking-causes-people-to-follow-the-crowd/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 18:01:39 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/widespread-masking-causes-people-to-follow-the-crowd/ Share this Item You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4.0 International license. The increased use of face coverings as a defense against COVID-19 is creating social norms that encourage more people to hide in public, according to a new study. The researchers based the study on two experiments based on surveys […]]]>

The increased use of face coverings as a defense against COVID-19 is creating social norms that encourage more people to hide in public, according to a new study.

The researchers based the study on two experiments based on surveys conducted in the United States and Italy, countries that have experienced severe outbreaks of COVID-19.

The study found evidence that in both countries, when an increasing number of people wear masks, it creates a cycle of self-reinforcement that promotes the behavior of others. This does not encourage people to “ride free” by not wearing face coverings while taking advantage of the protection offered by those who wear masks in public places.

“Wearing a community mask can be self-reinforcing,” says Scott E. Bokemper, associate researcher at the Institution for Social and Policy Studies at Yale University and the Center for American Politics, and senior author of the new article in PLOS ONE.

“People are more likely to wear masks and encourage others to do so when masks are ubiquitous. Importantly, we found no evidence that widespread masking reduces people’s willingness to wear masks or to ask others to wear their masks correctly.

“Of course, we often observe that some communities wear more masks than others, which suggests explanations based on social norms,” ​​he adds. “But the experimental design of this research allows us to rule out the possibility that these patterns arise for other reasons, such as people from different communities with different beliefs about the effectiveness of masks or fears about COVID-19.”

To hide or not to hide?

The study also shows that in the United States, public health campaigns that emphasize the use of face coverings to protect others are likely more effective than calls emphasizing how masks protect the wearer.

The researchers conducted survey experiments based on vignettes conducted in the United States between October 1 and October 22, 2020 and in Italy between October 22 and November 8, 2020. At the time, the United States did not ‘had no nationwide mask mandate, unlike Italy. . The American and Italian experiments had samples of 3,100 and 2,659 respondents, respectively.

Initially, researchers asked respondents about how often they wear COVID-19 masks and how often they see others in their communities doing the same. Then, they randomly assigned participants to read a text that explained how the masks protect the wearer or other people. A control group was presented with information unrelated to masking.

Participants read three vignettes: one about withdrawing money from an ATM, another about walking in a public park, and a third about attending a meeting room in their neighborhood. The behavior of the people depicted in the thumbnails was randomized so that almost everyone or very few wore masks.

In each scenario, respondents were asked what they would do if they forgot a mask or encountered someone wearing a face cover inappropriately. They were presented with four options: continue the activity normally; continue the activity but keep your distance from others; abandon the activity; either retrieve their own mask or ask the other person to wear theirs correctly. They were also asked to read the scenarios as unaffected third parties and report their assessment of the behavior described.

No evidence of “parasitism”

Experience has shown that in scenarios where almost everyone wore masks, the likelihood of respondents getting their own mask increased by 32% among American respondents and by 27% among Italian respondents. It also increased the likelihood of respondents asking a person to adjust their masks to fit properly by 26% and 29.4% in the US and Italian experiences, respectively.

Overall, the presence of people wearing masks made respondents more willing to retrieve masks or ask others to adjust their masks in all scenarios in the United States and in the meeting and meeting scenarios. ATM in Italy.

“We haven’t seen any evidence that seeing more people wearing masks encourages free riding,” says co-author Gregory A. Huber, professor of political science.

“On the contrary, it made people more likely to follow the social norm by wearing masks or intervening when they encountered someone with a mask slipping over their nose. A political implication of our work is that mask wearing may persist in communities where it is widely adopted in the absence of a government policy requiring the face covering. “

Providing information on how face coverings protect the wearer has had no effect on people’s behavior regarding masks in either country. However, the message about the effectiveness of masks in protecting others increased the willingness of American respondents to recover their face coverings in the experimental scenarios by 10.3% and their willingness to encourage others to wear face masks correctly. 13.6%. In the Italian experience, the effects of the message on protecting others were not statistically significant, according to the study.

Additional co-authors are from Columbia University, Yale, and institutions in Italy and Switzerland.

Source: Yale University


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Don’t miss CUA’s Gerhart Center webinar with Denise Hearn – Conferences – Al-Ahram Weekly https://www.scuolainsieme.com/dont-miss-cuas-gerhart-center-webinar-with-denise-hearn-conferences-al-ahram-weekly/ https://www.scuolainsieme.com/dont-miss-cuas-gerhart-center-webinar-with-denise-hearn-conferences-al-ahram-weekly/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 23:46:25 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/dont-miss-cuas-gerhart-center-webinar-with-denise-hearn-conferences-al-ahram-weekly/ American University in Cairo Sat 16, 7-8 p.m .: The Arab Cultural Program of the Department of Arab and Islamic Civilizations, in collaboration with the Cleveland H. Dodge Foundation, is hosting an evening on literary adaptations in Egyptian cinema. Professor of Comparative Literature at the Faculty of Arts, Cairo University Salma mobarak and Associate Professor […]]]>

American University in Cairo

Sat 16, 7-8 p.m .: The Arab Cultural Program of the Department of Arab and Islamic Civilizations, in collaboration with the Cleveland H. Dodge Foundation, is hosting an evening on literary adaptations in Egyptian cinema. Professor of Comparative Literature at the Faculty of Arts, Cairo University Salma mobarak and Associate Professor in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics at York University Walid El Khachab will talk about their recent book Al-Iqtibas: Min al-adab ila al-cinema, Dar al-Maraya, 2021. The conference will be held in Arabic. The zoom link is https://e.cglink.me/2kZ/r300058811

Mon 18, 7-8 p.m .: Join this Gerhart Center webinar series titled “From Myth of Capitalism to Integrated Economy” featuring Denise hearn, Principal Investigator, American Economic Liberties Project. Hearn is co-author of The myth of capitalism: monopolies and the death of competition – named one of the Financial Times’ best books of 2018. His writing has been featured in The Financial Times, Quartz, The Globe and Mail, and The Washington Post. She has presented topics on competition policy, macroeconomics and new economic thinking to audiences around the world. The link is https://e.cglink.me/2kZ/r300056974

American University in Cairo

Al-Sheikh Rihan Street, next to Tahrir Square, Tahrir Campus, tel 02 2615 2694/01280009077

Oriental Room

Wed 20, 6 p.m. – 7:45 p.m. (Cairo time): The School of Global Affairs and Public Policy (GAPP) will hold its Tahrir Dialogue (94) titled “Turkey’s Regional Policy”. Moderated by the founding dean of GAPP Ambassador Nabil fahmy, the conference will present the ambassador Karim Haggag, Practice Professor and Program Director, Middle East Studies at GAPP, Founding Director of the Turkey Program at the Middle East Institute Gonoul Tol, and political analyst Hend El Dawy.

D-CAF (October 1-22)

Mon 18, 7 pm-8:30pm (Online): “International Tour: Making the Most of Your Artistic Ideas Without Thumbing Up”, the session is in English with a live Arabic interpreter. In light of international travel restrictions and the current climate crisis, identifying alternative models of touring work – for example translating a live performance to different media or licensing an idea to another company – is of increasing interest to artists from all over the world. This year, D-CAF partnered with British cultural organization Farnham Maltings to present a workshop for art practitioners wishing to present their work to an international audience in this unprecedented global climate.

International producers of Farnham Maltings Hannah slimmon and Sophie Victoria leading the organization’s international agenda, helping theater designers, producers and arts organizations to think and work internationally by providing training, opportunities and events that foster collaboration and understanding.

The session will feature a series of case studies from artists and international organizations that will spark the ideas and confidence to find new and creative ways to disseminate your work, generate income and reach audiences around the world. whole. The animators are hosted by Victoria and Slimmon.

Italian cultural institute

Italy celebrated the 700e anniversary of the death of Dante Alighieri. In addition, the Italian Institute continues to publish videos in Arabic with translations of Dante Alighieri’s masterpiece. The Divine Comedy bring the Arabic-speaking public closer to the work of the supreme poet. The videos are produced by Giabluca Barbadori, with the special participation of Achraf Farouk, Amir Salaheddine, Sherine hegazy, and Sara El Mokadem.

Mon 18 to Sat 23 (Online): In its twenty-first edition, the Italian language week around the world titled “Dante and the Italian Language” is dedicated to the celebrations of Dante Alighieri during the 700 years that have passed since his death. Considered the father of the Italian language, Alighieri will inspire events and conferences dedicated to him. In collaboration with the Swiss Embassy, Italian schools and Italian departments of Egyptian universities. The week’s activities will take place in various locations and online, and admission is free. For the detailed program, visit the IIC website.

* A print version of this article appears in the October 14, 2021 edition of Al-Ahram Weekly

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Two historic Italian newspapers in Egypt to be digitized – Culture https://www.scuolainsieme.com/two-historic-italian-newspapers-in-egypt-to-be-digitized-culture/ https://www.scuolainsieme.com/two-historic-italian-newspapers-in-egypt-to-be-digitized-culture/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 16:21:00 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/two-historic-italian-newspapers-in-egypt-to-be-digitized-culture/ CAIRO – Italian Ambassador to Egypt Giampaolo Cantini, during his last public event as Ambassador, announced the start of a “project to digitize two historical newspapers published by the Italian community in Egypt between 1895 and 1940 “. Cantini’s comments came at an event Sunday at the Italian Cultural Institute in Cairo to showcase three […]]]>

CAIRO – Italian Ambassador to Egypt Giampaolo Cantini, during his last public event as Ambassador, announced the start of a “project to digitize two historical newspapers published by the Italian community in Egypt between 1895 and 1940 “.

Cantini’s comments came at an event Sunday at the Italian Cultural Institute in Cairo to showcase three cultural initiatives from the Italian Embassy.

The two newspapers that will be digitized are “L’Imparziale” and “Giornale d’Oriente”.

“This is a collection made up of 181 volumes which will be fully scanned and digitized, and will be available for consultation online,” Cantini said, calling it “one of a kind cultural heritage relating to a crucial period for the history of modernity Egypt “.

Cantini said the newspapers provide “very meaningful accounts of Italy’s contribution to the development of the country’s institutions and civil society”.

The newspapers were published in Cairo and Alexandria, said Wafaa El Beih, coordinator of the project, which was carried out with the Italian Institute of Culture in Cairo.

“The most important Italian daily, and the one with the longest life, is ‘L’Imparziale’, which was founded in 1892,” said El Beih, professor at Helwan University.

“Then in 1930 it merged with the ‘Messaggero Egiziano di Alessandria’ taking the name ‘Giornale d’Oriente’, which remained in publication until 1940,” she said.

She said the newspaper “gave ample space to news from Cairo and Alexandria, news from ministries, courts and the stock exchange.”

The project aims to provide “global access” to the collections, removing barriers of geographic distance and economic or political conditions, she said.

Cantini said the work was made possible “by the generous contribution of Alexbank”, the Egyptian-controlled branch of the Intesa Sanpaolo banking group.


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BepiColombo’s first close-up images of Mercury suggest answers to the planet’s secrets https://www.scuolainsieme.com/bepicolombos-first-close-up-images-of-mercury-suggest-answers-to-the-planets-secrets/ https://www.scuolainsieme.com/bepicolombos-first-close-up-images-of-mercury-suggest-answers-to-the-planets-secrets/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 11:17:08 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/bepicolombos-first-close-up-images-of-mercury-suggest-answers-to-the-planets-secrets/ This article originally appeared on The conversation. The post contributed the article to Space.com’s Expert voices: Op-Ed & Insights. David rothery, professor of planetary geosciences, The Open University The BepiColombo spacecraft – a joint project of European and Japanese space agencies – tipped over to its destination planet Mercury in the early hours of Saturday, […]]]>

This article originally appeared on The conversation. The post contributed the article to Space.com’s Expert voices: Op-Ed & Insights.

David rothery, professor of planetary geosciences, The Open University


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Nobel Prize for Literature awarded to novelist Abdulrazak Gurnah https://www.scuolainsieme.com/nobel-prize-for-literature-awarded-to-novelist-abdulrazak-gurnah/ https://www.scuolainsieme.com/nobel-prize-for-literature-awarded-to-novelist-abdulrazak-gurnah/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 14:36:48 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/nobel-prize-for-literature-awarded-to-novelist-abdulrazak-gurnah/ Novelist Abdulrazak Gurnah won the Nobel Prize for Literature on Thursday. Gurnah was born on the Tanzanian island of Zanzibar but arrived in the UK as a refugee in the 1960s and lives there today. His work focuses on the experience and identity of refugees. The Swedish Academy, which chose the laureates, said it chose […]]]>

Novelist Abdulrazak Gurnah won the Nobel Prize for Literature on Thursday.

Gurnah was born on the Tanzanian island of Zanzibar but arrived in the UK as a refugee in the 1960s and lives there today.

His work focuses on the experience and identity of refugees.

The Swedish Academy, which chose the laureates, said it chose Gurnah “for his uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism and the plight of refugees in the chasm between cultures and continents”.

Abdulrazak Gurnah, Tanzanian Nobel Laureate in Literature, pictured in Modena, Italy on April 6, 2006.Leonardo Cendamo File / Getty Images

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It comes after a few difficult years for the prestigious award, which was awarded to American poet Louise Glück last year – a more popular choice after a string of controversies.

The award was postponed to 2018 after allegations of sexual abuse rocked the Swedish Academy.

There were protests in 2019 after he was handed over to Austrian writer Peter Handke due to his strong support for Serbs during the Balkan wars of the 1990s.

In 2016, the academy broke with tradition and presented the award to Bob Dylan, the first musician to win the award.

In addition to international recognition, Gurnah will receive a gold medal and 10 million Swedish kronor (over $ 1.14 million). The money comes from the estate of the prize’s founder, Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel, who died in 1895.

Until his recent retirement, Gurnah was Professor of English and Postcolonial Literature at the University of Kent, UK. In 1994, his novel “Paradise” was shortlisted for the Booker Prize.

The German Benjamin List and the Scottish David WC MacMillan won the Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday.

And on Tuesday, the Japanese-American Syukuro Manabe, the German Klaus Hasselmann and the Italian Giorgio Parisi won the Nobel Prize in physics.

On Monday, American scientists David Julius and Ardem Patapoutian won the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine.

Alexandre smith contributed.


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