Language school – Scuola Insieme http://www.scuolainsieme.com/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 16:06:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T191058.566-150x150.png Language school – Scuola Insieme http://www.scuolainsieme.com/ 32 32 Mundo Latino: Mother-daughter team runs long-running Spanish-language radio show in the Berkshires | Berkshire landscapes https://www.scuolainsieme.com/mundo-latino-mother-daughter-team-runs-long-running-spanish-language-radio-show-in-the-berkshires-berkshire-landscapes/ https://www.scuolainsieme.com/mundo-latino-mother-daughter-team-runs-long-running-spanish-language-radio-show-in-the-berkshires-berkshire-landscapes/#respond Fri, 22 Oct 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/mundo-latino-mother-daughter-team-runs-long-running-spanish-language-radio-show-in-the-berkshires-berkshire-landscapes/ A mother and daughter from Great Barrington are making waves in the Berkshires – radio waves, that is. Fridays from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Berkshirites can hear the styles of Martha Escobar and her daughter, Deisy Escobar, on 89.7 WTBR-FM or 97.7 WBCR-FM . The Spanish-language […]]]>

A mother and daughter from Great Barrington are making waves in the Berkshires – radio waves, that is.

Fridays from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Berkshirites can hear the styles of Martha Escobar and her daughter, Deisy Escobar, on 89.7 WTBR-FM or 97.7 WBCR-FM . The Spanish-language radio show Mundo Latino: Recordando Tus Raíces has been broadcast for 14 years.






Melisa Canavan, Deisy Esobar and Martha Escobar

Mundo Latino welcomes Deisy Escobar (center) and Martha Escobar (right), stop for a selfie with guest Melissa Canavan (left), Membership and Special Projects Coordinator at Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center.




“Our mission is to keep the immigration community informed of all the services Berkshire County has to offer,” said Martha Escobar.

On the show, the couple provide information to immigrants and newcomers to the country about English lessons and legal advice while keeping their roots alive by sprinkling with Latin music, including merengue, salsa and bachata. . Martha and Deisy also interview experts in their fields on a number of topics relevant to their listeners.

In the past, the duo have asked doctors at Fairview Hospital about the COVID-19 pandemic and vaccinations; a spokesperson for the Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center on its films in Spanish and Latin events; an ovarian cancer survivor and several others from the Elizabeth Freeman Center and the Berkshire Immigration Center. The Escobars also maintain an ongoing series on Immigrants Making a Difference.

“[In the series] People tell how they came to this country; how they started and what they are doing now. These are inspiring stories of how people in our community have made their dreams come true, ”said Martha Escobar.

Martha, from Bogota, Colombia, first came to the United States via Sheffield 21 years ago looking for better job opportunities and a chance to continue her university education. When she left Colombia, she said that the economic situation was very difficult and that she wanted to be able to help her mother financially. When she arrived in the United States, her first job was as a dishwasher.

These days, she is currently working on a psychology degree at Berkshire Community College and aims to become a bilingual therapist in the community while working at the Elizabeth Freeman Center as a bilingual lawyer and counselor.

Her first time on the air came after a friend invited her to his show in 2007. The following year, Mundo Latino was launched. For six years, the program was broadcast only in Spanish. But when 8-year-old Deisy asked her mother if she could read a poem on the air, Martha agreed and Deisy, now 16 and a student at Mount Everett High School, hasn’t left since.






Mundo Latino 2.jpg

Deisy Escobar interviews Eduardo “Eddie” O’Toole, founder of Berkshire Amistad or Grupo Royal on Mundo Latino: Recordando Tus Raíces.




Since Martha slipped the mic to share with her daughter, the show has moved to a bilingual format.

“I grew up watching my mom do that. The way she expressed herself in Spanish and how passionate she was, it really inspired me. I wanted to be like her, ”Deisy said. “I like working together and growing together. We share the same passions a lot, so it comes quite naturally. I grew up with both cultures: Hispanic and American and it’s wonderful to be able to share this with the community. Being able to share this culture in a bilingual way is a huge privilege. I have the best of both worlds, I like to say.

Deisy highlighted volunteering, Latin folk dancing and helping the community among the passions she shares with her mother.

Outside of Mundo Latino and his classes at Mount Everett, Deisy is an intern with the Southern Berkshire Health Coalition at the Railroad Street Youth Project. She is also a member of the Social Justice Club and a board member of Latinas 413. The 16-year-old is also a professor at the Literacy Network of South Berkshire and has two students, one from Colombia and one from El Salvador.

“I am very proud of her,” Martha said of her daughter. “I love to see how dedicated she is to helping others. These kids are living what I did when I first came here [to this country], and I tell him to help them as you can.






Deisy Escobar

Deisy Escobar, 16, is half of the mother-daughter team that makes up Mundo Latino: Recordando Tus Raíces, a radio show that airs on 89.7 WTBR-FM Pittsfield and 97.7 WBCR-FM Great Barrington.




A recent Mundo Latino program featured a guest who discussed preparing for work. For those coming from another country like Colombia, Martha said there are some differences in the way employers search and interview potential candidates. Their program touched on the importance of being on time, asking questions, wearing proper attire, looking an interviewer in the eye, and knowing the company.

“A lot of our listeners are new here and are starting from scratch. We try to give them as many resources as possible, because the situation is probably very different here than what they are used to, ”said Deisy. “Take Colombia – because that’s what we compare it to – for example: if they don’t contact you in a week or less in Colombia, that means you didn’t get the job. Here you can and are encouraged to call. It can take much more than a week to get a response from an employer.

With the show, the Escobars continue to help make connections with culture. Reflecting on her own trip to the United States and becoming a citizen, Martha said it was important that she and her daughter let other members of the Latin community know that they are not alone.

“We have a space where we can make our voices heard. We don’t want them to feel isolated or depressed. It is very difficult to start a new life because of the language barrier or the lack of family, but it is possible to make our dreams come true, ”she said. “It’s not magic. It takes a lot of hard work, but we make sure to let people know that there are leaders and resources available to help.

For those who may have missed Mundo Latino’s live programming, their website https://linktr.ee/mundolatino has links to past episodes, podcasts, and even simulcast TV shows.

“I hope those who connect will feel the joy we have for our music and the love we put into the show,” Deisy said. “You don’t have to be Latin or even speak Spanish to enjoy it. Everyone is welcome.


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BVSD school board discusses community school model https://www.scuolainsieme.com/bvsd-school-board-discusses-community-school-model/ https://www.scuolainsieme.com/bvsd-school-board-discusses-community-school-model/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 02:56:31 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/bvsd-school-board-discusses-community-school-model/ The Boulder Valley School District is exploring the community schools model as a way to better meet the needs of students and families. The school board heard a presentation at a working session Tuesday on The Model, which provides services in schools beyond academics, from healthcare to tutoring to mental health counseling, with the help […]]]>

The Boulder Valley School District is exploring the community schools model as a way to better meet the needs of students and families.

The school board heard a presentation at a working session Tuesday on The Model, which provides services in schools beyond academics, from healthcare to tutoring to mental health counseling, with the help from community partnerships.

Actor Preston Adams, left, leads a group of first graders in an exercise during the Backstory Theater after-school program at Emerald Elementary School in Broomfield on Tuesday. The after-school program, dubbed “Dragon School,” is funded by the US Department of Education’s 21st Century Community Learning Centers Grant. (Matthew Jonas / Personal Photographer)

“It really becomes a collaborative effort between families, schools and the community to solve these problems collaboratively,” said Sam Messier, deputy superintendent of strategic initiatives for Boulder Valley. “Schools can function as neighborhood centers. “

Board members were generally supportive and asked district leaders to move forward by taking stock of what is already available in schools and researching models of community needs assessment in the area. purpose of asking parents to provide feedback on what is needed.

Supports that already exist in the district include the Family Resource Schools program, a joint partnership between Boulder and the school district providing “wrap around” services to five elementary schools in Boulder. Clinica Family Health also provides school dental services and referrals to six elementary schools.

On the extended learning side, Emerald Elementary School in Broomfield and Alicia Sanchez Elementary School in Lafayette offer two hours of after-school classes, with bus service, as well as one-to-one math and math lessons. literacy twice a week for some students. Both schools also offer enrichment classes that include robotics, drama, music, soccer, and yoga. Extended Learning Opportunities are funded by a Federal 21st Century Learning Grant.

While Boulder Valley may have some of the elements in place, Messier said, what makes the community schools model effective is the combination of four key elements: built-in supports for students; expanded and enriched learning time and activities; active family and community involvement; and collaborative leadership.

Fifth-grade student Kaliyah Peoples-Brewer, right, draws on Tuesday during a community building class at the after-school program at Emerald Elementary School in Broomfield. (Matthew Jonas / Personal Photographer)

Board member Richard Garcia added that in his experiences working with Latino parents he has found that successful community school programs require a school leader who truly embraces the concept and supports collaboration.

“It’s about empowering families to make change in their communities and schools,” he said.

The model is most often used in urban areas, especially New York. But Tuesday’s presentation included Carlin Springs Elementary in Arlington, Va., As an example of a successful suburban school with a demographics similar to Alicia Sanchez Elementary.

Carlin Springs offers after-school enrichment activities, academic parent and teacher teams, weekly developmental playgroups for toddlers, computer and language classes for parents, and monthly farmer’s markets. by a local food bank. The city’s social services department also provides mental health, health and dental resources to families, while a full-time public health nurse manages health referrals.

While supporting the concept, board chair Tina Marquis urged the board to consider budget impacts and look to community partners to help cover costs.

The costs of operating a multi-site community school model include one person to oversee the program, program managers in each school, extended hours for school support staff, possible building expansion, and transportation, district officials said.

“It’s a pretty big commitment, if done right,” said Marquis.


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MSU College of Education announces 2021 MACTE Award winners https://www.scuolainsieme.com/msu-college-of-education-announces-2021-macte-award-winners/ https://www.scuolainsieme.com/msu-college-of-education-announces-2021-macte-award-winners/#respond Mon, 18 Oct 2021 21:30:00 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/msu-college-of-education-announces-2021-macte-award-winners/ Contact: Camille Carskadon STARKVILLE, Mississippi — The Mississippi State College of Education announces new MSU alumni among this year’s recipients of the Mississippi Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. “I would like to congratulate the college’s 2021 MACTE award winners. These exceptional educators are making a difference in the lives of students and families in […]]]>

Contact: Camille Carskadon

STARKVILLE, Mississippi — The Mississippi State College of Education announces new MSU alumni among this year’s recipients of the Mississippi Association of Colleges for Teacher Education.

“I would like to congratulate the college’s 2021 MACTE award winners. These exceptional educators are making a difference in the lives of students and families in Mississippi, ”said Dean Teresa Jayroe of MSU College of Education.

The winners include:

Savannah shows

Savannah shows, MACTE Outstanding Teacher Trainee Award. The recent MSU Primary Education graduate completed her teaching internship at Fifth Street School in the West Point Consolidated School District and now teaches English in a virtual academy.

Portrait of Hilute Hudson
Hilute Hudson

Hilute Hudson, MACTE Graduate Student Award in Outstanding Educational Leadership. Superintendent of education in the Kemper County School District, Hudson has consistently demonstrated innovation and leadership in his school district and during his graduate studies in the State of Mississippi.

Portrait of Mallory Carlisle
Mallory carlisle

Mallory carlisle, MACTE Award for Outstanding Educator. Carlisle is a 23-year-old veteran educator and MSU alumnus who teaches history in grade seven at the Partnership Middle School in the Starkville Oktibbeha County School District.

Portrait of Russell Keene
Russell keene

Russell keene, MACTE Award for Exceptional Director. Principal of Southeast Lauderdale High School in the Lauderdale County School District, he has always provided excellent internships for future teachers and interns.

MACTE is a statewide organization affiliated with the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. Its members include departments and schools of regionally accredited Mississippi colleges and universities engaged in the preparation of professional school personnel. As a consortium of teacher training schools, MACTE is extremely interested in supporting and improving all aspects of education in Mississippi. Its members work cooperatively within the organization and with the Mississippi Department of Education and other education groups statewide.

Founded in 1903, MSU’s College of Education is home to six academic departments, a research unit, and numerous service units. To learn more about the college, visit www.educ.msstate.edu.

MSU is Mississippi’s premier university, available online at www.msstate.edu.


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Colleges Collaborate to Preserve Tribal Language and Culture https://www.scuolainsieme.com/colleges-collaborate-to-preserve-tribal-language-and-culture/ https://www.scuolainsieme.com/colleges-collaborate-to-preserve-tribal-language-and-culture/#respond Sun, 17 Oct 2021 15:35:30 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/colleges-collaborate-to-preserve-tribal-language-and-culture/ BISMARCK, ND (AP) – The Fort Berthold Indian Reservation Tribal College and the University of North Dakota at Grand Forks are working together on a project to digitally preserve the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara language and culture. The schools will use a $ 500,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to fund the […]]]>

BISMARCK, ND (AP) – The Fort Berthold Indian Reservation Tribal College and the University of North Dakota at Grand Forks are working together on a project to digitally preserve the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara language and culture.

The schools will use a $ 500,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to fund the initiative, which includes a separate effort to stimulate the study of American Indian history in the Dakotas.

Professors and students at Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College in New Town will conduct oral interviews with elders from the three affiliated tribes, then catalog, preserve and digitize what officials consider to be “critically endangered” language resources and other knowledge. traditional at risk. The UND team will contribute to the digital collection.

Together, the schools will create educational resources for the new Kindergarten to Grade 12 Native American History curriculum and as part of a special tribal campus program, the Bismarck Tribune reported.

Earlier this year, the North Dakota Legislature approved a bill requiring primary education to focus on federally recognized Indian tribes: the three affiliated tribes, the Standing Rock Sioux, Spirit Lake Nation, Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa and Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate. Nation.

The Standing Rock and Sisseton Wahpeton reserves both extend as far as South Dakota.


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Fitchburg-based Spanish Learning Center wants students to love the language | Local News https://www.scuolainsieme.com/fitchburg-based-spanish-learning-center-wants-students-to-love-the-language-local-news/ https://www.scuolainsieme.com/fitchburg-based-spanish-learning-center-wants-students-to-love-the-language-local-news/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 11:30:00 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/fitchburg-based-spanish-learning-center-wants-students-to-love-the-language-local-news/ His teachers focused less on whether students got perfect grades on their homework and more on getting them into real conversations. “You wanted to get in touch with the teachers. They brought so much positivity, ”said De Pierola. “I think that made me think, ‘OK, I want to learn this language because I love this […]]]>

His teachers focused less on whether students got perfect grades on their homework and more on getting them into real conversations. “You wanted to get in touch with the teachers. They brought so much positivity, ”said De Pierola. “I think that made me think, ‘OK, I want to learn this language because I love this teacher. “






Spanish Learning Center IYB 101321 03-10132021145943

Diana De Pierola, owner of the Spanish Learning Center, shows off her teaching materials in her home office in Fitchburg.


RUTHIE HAUGE


Now, several degrees, jobs and trips around the world later, De Pierola is trying to provide the same experience for aspiring Spanish speakers in the Madison area. From an office on the ground floor of her Fitchburg home, she runs the Spanish Learning Center, which offers virtual and in-person Spanish lessons for children and adults.

Since the launch of the company in 2020, she has adapted her courses to the age and level of each student. Inspired by the classes she took in Peru, she keeps a supply of games and activities close at hand. She even looked for textbooks from the same company that made the materials from which she studied Spanish.






Spanish Learning Center IYB 101321 04-10132021145943

Spanish Learning Center owner Diana De Pierola shows off a Spanish textbook that she uses with older and more advanced students.


RUTHIE HAUGE


Most importantly, she tries to treat her students like her favorite teachers have treated her. “When they saw me as a person, I felt connected and wanted to learn more, more than just being in a class (where) a teacher just teaches a lesson… It’s not engaging at all.”

The emotions that students feel as they learn shape their attitude towards the material, said De Pierola. So she plans her sessions accordingly, whether she’s sitting with students at home or watching them through a computer screen. Sometimes she comes in a decorative headband with a rainbow-colored unicorn horn. “I’m just trying to connect with them and how they’re doing and how they’re feeling,” De Pierola said.


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🌱 “Strong mayor” envisioned + High levels of red tide found https://www.scuolainsieme.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1-strong-mayor-envisioned-high-levels-of-red-tide-found/ https://www.scuolainsieme.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1-strong-mayor-envisioned-high-levels-of-red-tide-found/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 02:47:00 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1-strong-mayor-envisioned-high-levels-of-red-tide-found/ Hello, neighbors! Here is the Friday issue of the Sarasota Daily. First, the weather forecast for the day: Partly sunny and humid. High: 91 Low: 71. Here are the best stories today in Sarasota: Looking for a fun way to celebrate halloween with the family? Check out these next Sarasota County Events. (Sarasota badge) High […]]]>

Hello, neighbors! Here is the Friday issue of the Sarasota Daily.


First, the weather forecast for the day:

Partly sunny and humid. High: 91 Low: 71.


Here are the best stories today in Sarasota:

  1. Looking for a fun way to celebrate halloween with the family? Check out these next Sarasota County Events. (Sarasota badge)
  2. High levels of red tide were found in Sarasota and Manatee Counties this week. Some dead fish were found at Nokomis Beach and Manasota Key Beach. (Sarasota Herald-Tribune)
  3. The Charter review committee discuss the possibility of changing Sarasota’s form of government. On the table is a “strong mayor” government structure. (YourObserver.com)
  4. Number of COVID-19 hospitalizations in Sarasota County and the state has dropped considerably and Sarasota Memorial Hospital almost returned to normal operations. (Sarasota Herald-Tribune)
  5. Sarasota County gets his first bilingual school, where students will learn English and Spanish. (WWSB)

Today’s Sarasota Daily is brought to you by our friends at Verizon. They are building the fastest 5G network in the country. To find out how 5G will change the lives of you and your community – and to access this amazing technology – click here. And thank you Verizon for sponsoring this community resource in Sarasota!

  • Sarasota County Government: “Here is today’s #SRQCounty COVID-19 map which includes the total number of cases reported in the last 14 days, shown by zip code and per percentage per capita in each zip code. To view the latest report, visit : https: // loom .ly / a4JJc … “(Facebook)
  • Sarasota County Humanitarian Society:🚨Rocky Update🚨 Paw Patrol: Office Edition Rocky takes his office duties seriously. His job description includes frolicking, sniffing other people’s lunches, barking for attention during meetings and melting everyone’s hearts that he … “(Facebook)
  • New Florida College: “In the latest news … Kudos to Antonia Ginsberg-Klemmt, recently featured by the Tampa Bay Business Journal in their list of 25 entrepreneurs under 25. Her patent-pending invention is called GismoPower — a mobile solar device. foldable … “(Instagram)
  • Florida Department of Health (DOH): “It’s time to get vaccinated! Our mobile vaccination clinics make it quick and easy to get vaccinated. No appointment required! Check the schedule today to find a location near you! ” (Facebook)
  • City of Sarasota, Government: “A special artistic collaboration between the Sarasota School Of Arts / Sciences and the Rosemary Art & Design District is now temporarily on display at the future Rosemary Park site. Middle school students have been invited to study the distinctive work …” (Facebook)
  • Sarasota County Humanitarian Society:⛔CATS NEED YOUR HELP! ⛔ We desperately need cat litter and non-clumping kitten food. Please visit our Amazon Wish List to donate our most needed items: https: // amzn .to / 3j1PyHG. If you can’t donate, please suggest us … “(Facebook)
  • Sarasota County Schools: “When you complete a free / discounted meal request, it does more than determine your eligibility for free or reduced school meals. Each completed request helps provide or justify funding that will support ALL STUDENTS in Sarasot … ” (Facebook)
  • Sarasota County Government: The Sarasota County Penny Sales Tax, also known as the Surcharge or One Cent Tax, splits the revenue locally among the County, School District, Town of Longboat Key, and Towns of North Port, Sarasota and Venice, and provides funding for ro … “(Facebook)
  • Playing in Sarasota County: “Why are some historic places beautiful while others are frightening? One thing is certain, we will not slip into this courtyard at night. Find even more #spooky #localhistory images in the #SRQCountyHistory database: https: // voila … “(Facebook)
  • Sarasota County Library Foundation: “Here is a simple but important way to support our library system. Sarasota County would like our feedback on how to spend the public money raised under the Penny Sales Tax (Surtax IV). 𝐬𝐮𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐱 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐞𝐧𝐬 … “(Facebook)
  • Sarasota and Manatee Real Estate Association: “Don’t miss the Tanner’s Turkeys fundraising event on October 28 at Meadows Country Club, featuring live music, aperitifs, cash bar, silent auctions and a 50/50 raffle! $ 49 for the annual Tanner’s Turkeys e .. fundraiser. ” (Facebook)
  • Sarasota County Election Supervisor: Voters in the City of Venice and the City of LBK: Postal ballots (absent) for the 11/2 election can be returned now by mail or to our offices in Venice (4000 Tamiami Trail S. ) or Sarasota (2001 Adams Lane). We must receive your ballot before 7:00 PM … “(Facebook)

From our sponsors – thank you for supporting the local news!

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You are now in the know and ready to start this Friday on the right foot! See you tomorrow morning for your next update. If you enjoy these newsletters, consider bringing some of your friends and neighbors into the fold. You can send them this link to subscribe.

Tiffany Razzano

Got a tip or suggestion for an upcoming Sarasota Daily? You can contact me at tiffany.razzano@patch.com.



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Did Yale Law School Punish A Federalist Society Fellow For His Speech? https://www.scuolainsieme.com/did-yale-law-school-punish-a-federalist-society-fellow-for-his-speech/ https://www.scuolainsieme.com/did-yale-law-school-punish-a-federalist-society-fellow-for-his-speech/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 22:40:00 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/did-yale-law-school-punish-a-federalist-society-fellow-for-his-speech/ The on-campus free speech debate erupted again on Wednesday with the publication of a Washington Free Beacon article alleging that Yale Law School retaliated against a conservative student’s speech. The school pressured the Federalist Society student to apologize for an email deemed racist by several classmates, according to Aaron Sibarium of Free Beacon. History has […]]]>

The on-campus free speech debate erupted again on Wednesday with the publication of a Washington Free Beacon article alleging that Yale Law School retaliated against a conservative student’s speech. The school pressured the Federalist Society student to apologize for an email deemed racist by several classmates, according to Aaron Sibarium of Free Beacon. History has drawn widespread contempt from the right: Senator Tom Cotton describe Yale’s alleged conduct as “insanity,” a sentiment shared by critical colleagues contemporary Higher Education in the USA.

This answer, on its own, should illustrate the folly of Yale’s actions in this matter. Even the slightest appearance of retaliation against conservative students for protected speech only reinforces the victim mentality that the Federalist Society cultivates among its members. It supplies water to the grievance-industrial complex that drives the conservative legal movement. And that gives the right to portray educational institutions as indoctrination factories that instill awakened group thinking in students. What happened here is inherently wrong. But this is especially reckless in the context of our campus culture wars, in which every perceived affront to a member of the Federalist Society can be seen as evidence of a vast plot to suppress conservative views.

The YLS controversy began when a sophomore invited his classmates to a “Constitution Day Bash”. This student, whose name has been withheld by the Free Beacon, is a member of both the Native American Law Students Association and the Federalist Society. His email explained that the party, co-hosted by the Federalist Society, would be held at the “NALSA Trap House”. It would include “American themed snacks” including, but not limited to, “Popeye’s Chicken”.

This email prompted up to nine students to file complaints with the Office of Student Affairs. Associate Dean Ellen Cosgrove and Director of Diversity Yaseen Eldik then called the student into their office to discuss the matter. These administrators said the language of the email had racist overtones and advised him to apologize; they also claimed that “the association of the email with FedSoc was very triggering.” (The student recorded these conversations and Free Beacon posted the audio.) During their conversations with the student, Cosgrove and Eldik arguably hinted that the student would face professional consequences if he did. he didn’t apologize. For example, Eldick told the student, “The university has changed its approach to a lot of these issues. And you are a law student, and there is a bar [exam] you have to take, and we think it’s important to really give you a 360 view.

Sibarium interpreted this language as a veiled threat, as potential lawyers must undergo a personality and fitness investigation to join the bar. According to Sibarium, Eldick hinted that YLS might tell the bar that the student doesn’t have the character to become a lawyer unless he apologizes. There is another possible interpretation, however: anyone may file complaints during the character and fitness investigation, so Eldick could have warned the student that a disgruntled classmate might be trying to derail his career by reporting this incident. Whatever Eldick wanted to say at the time, he made it clear a month later that “we were never going to put our letterhead and write anything at the bar about you.”

When law schools treat their students like children, they invite nothing but pain.

Social media flattened this story into a simple narrative: Liberal bureaucrats punish conservative misconceptions to appease awakened leftists. The truth is more complicated. No aspect of the student’s email is overtly racist, but taken together the references to a “trap house” and “Popeye’s hen” are, at a minimum, heavy. The email was juvenile and unprofessional. Also, the school’s response was not overtly censored. In a statement on Wednesday, YLS spokeswoman Debra Kroszner wrote that “at no time has a disciplinary investigation been opened or disciplinary action taken in this matter,” and nothing in the audio contradicts this declaration.

Nevertheless, the intervention of Cosgrove and Eldik was misguided. Calling a student in the Associate Dean’s office via email sounds like retaliation against free speech; The same applies to the possibility, intentionally or not, that the email could prevent a future admission to the bar. Dealing with the anger of school administrators may not be a real punishment, but it is certainly a rebuke designed to send a message of disapproval. As a private school, YLS is not bound by the First Amendment; even if it did, these actions might not qualify as unconstitutional retaliation against protected speech. Still, they’re serious enough to spark fears that the school will berate a conservative student for an expression disadvantaged by his progressive classmates.

So Yale’s decision here was not a good one through the prism of free speech; even if we assume the school’s intentions were pure – which is open to debate – its answer was wrong, period. But it’s especially troubling in light of the Federalist Society’s long-held claims, which are integral to the organization’s self-image, that its members are a persecuted minority. The Federalist Society was founded on the premise that law schools are dominated by liberal ideologues who seek to stifle opposing conservative views. It instills in its members what George F. Will, a prominent promoter of the Federalist Society, once called the “coveted status” of victimization. And he regularly hosts events alleging conservative campus rhetoric is in jeopardy.

This feeling of discrimination is objectively ridiculous: the company is today one of the most powerful private associations in the country. Six sitting judges were members of the Federalist Society, as were a large number of lower court judges; about 90 percent of Trump’s appeal candidates are affiliated with the organization. Yet the illusion of victimization remains powerful and provides the glue that binds federalist society together. Its members elevate each other to positions of power, forming a tight-knit network that now dominates the federal judiciary. The Free Beacon article will only reinforce this us versus them mentality, providing fodder for Conservative lawyers who insist the Liberals are trying to “shut them up” in the words of Justice Clarence Thomas.

In May, Stanford opened an investigation and suspended the diploma of a progressive law student after members of the Federalist Society complained that he had made fun of them. This punishment goes beyond anything YLS has done here, but one rule of thumb can be drawn from both cases: Law schools should not get involved in disputes between students over the protection of speech. This does not help the speaker, his detractors, or the school itself. Whether the temptation to take the plunge is benign or malignant, formal intervention only makes matters worse for all parties. Law students are adults. When their schools treat them like children, they only invite pain.



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Zionsville Education Foundation Announces Grants for Fall Class of 2021 • Current Publishing https://www.scuolainsieme.com/zionsville-education-foundation-announces-grants-for-fall-class-of-2021-current-publishing/ https://www.scuolainsieme.com/zionsville-education-foundation-announces-grants-for-fall-class-of-2021-current-publishing/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 17:22:50 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/zionsville-education-foundation-announces-grants-for-fall-class-of-2021-current-publishing/ The Zionsville Education Foundation recently awarded $ 26,640.89 in fall class grants to 19 educators in Zionsville community schools. The 2021 Fall Class Grants fund innovative projects across all grades, across the eight ZCS schools. The grants were made possible through donations from the Duke Energy Foundation, the Barth Family Fund and individual ZEF donors. […]]]>

The Zionsville Education Foundation recently awarded $ 26,640.89 in fall class grants to 19 educators in Zionsville community schools.

The 2021 Fall Class Grants fund innovative projects across all grades, across the eight ZCS schools. The grants were made possible through donations from the Duke Energy Foundation, the Barth Family Fund and individual ZEF donors.

“We are grateful to the donors whose generosity will bring these creative projects to life for ZCS students,” ZEF Board Chairman Challis Imes said in a press release. “The kindness of our community and its commitment to academic excellence are unparalleled. “

The 2021 Fall Classroom Grants fund creative projects across multiple disciplines, including STEM, literacy, the arts, cognitive and motor skills, social sciences, and technology.

“These eleven scholarships will impact more than 7,000 students this school year, with many projects

to provide students with unique learning experiences for years to come, ”said Jane Louiso, ZEF Board Member and Chair of the Grants Committee.

Applications are reviewed by the Classroom Grants Committee consisting of six members of the ZEF Board of Directors and seven volunteer community members.

In 2020, ZEF awarded more than $ 127,000 in grants to ZCS teachers and students to fund their creative solutions and innovative ideas in virtual, hybrid and in-person learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. ZEF is in its 26th year and to date has provided over $ 1.5 million to support schools in Zionsville.

Zionsville Education Foundation Fall Class Grants 2021:

  • See the little things with a camera and a microscope monitor
    Andy Seward, Melissa Betustak and Alex Truex, Zionsville Middle School ($ 464.03)
    The purchase of a microscopic camera and monitor will allow students to project and view images and videos from a microscope. This will help ZMS science teachers to demonstrate how to use a microscope. It will also give students the opportunity to share interesting microscopic organisms with the whole class and allow teachers to put images on Canvas for student reference or to help in case of absence.
  • Calling all entrepreneurs
    Stephanie Martinelli and Laura Czerwionka, Pleasant View Elementary ($ 3,072.72)
    Provides resources to develop the 2nd year economics unit by rooting it in high interest non-fiction literature. Students will read books about inventions and toy makers and learn how these products and entrepreneurs impacted our world. Students will then use what they have learned to create and mass produce their own toys for sale in the grade two market.
  • Stimulate creativity
    Sarah West, Zionsville Middle School ($ 3,750)
    New pottery towers will stimulate creativity in art classes at Zionsville Middle School. This hands-on learning experience will allow students to create bowls, cups, mugs and vases while increasing their self-confidence as they take on a new artistic challenge, solve problems, and demonstrate courage and determination. to create functional works of art.
  • Talk about the city
    ZCS English as a New Language Teachers, Kris Barksdale, Julie Luker, Mandy Keller, Cathy Patel ($ 1,000).
    This grant will allow students who are learning English to explore the city in which they live while practicing the necessary language skills. Students will learn more about what Zionsville has to offer while building confidence in their communication skills.
  • Support reading and social studies in all elementary schools
    Christine Squier for all ZCS elementary schools ($ 11,678.16).
    Rich and diverse texts in support of social studies standards will be purchased for each ZCS elementary school – Eagle, Union, Pleasant View, Stonegate and Boone Meadow. Teachers worked over the summer to create units for each term to teach social studies concepts through books instead of a textbook.
  • Orchestral technological tools
    David Schurger, Zionsville Community High School ($ 1,927)
    These technological tools will allow Mr. Schurger to be more effective as an educator to provide the best orchestral learning environment for his students. A Harmony Director keyboard is accessible from anywhere in the classroom, and an iPad Pro will provide seamless transitions between sheet music, full sheet music viewing, and part editing.
  • Brain / body in balance with sensory pathways
    Deborah Torrance, Stonegate Elementary School ($ 676.12).
    This grant provides material for sensory pathways that engage different parts of the brain and body. This whole-body engagement can help students by calming the brain, stimulating brain activation for learning, and providing outlets for excess energy and emotional simulation.
  • Increase curiosity by increasing literacy
    Jenna Snow, Zionsville Middle School ($ 1,398.25).
    Science magazines will be used to increase science literacy and engage students in discussions on science issues that affect us all. Relevant and in-depth current events will allow Snow to teach students reading strategies to improve understanding of scientific literature, unlike traditional science textbooks.
  • Playing Monopoly Can Teach You About Money And Business
    Gil Speer, Zionsville Community High School ($ 650).
    Students will compete in Monopoly games in the classroom. They will be tracking their net worth throughout the semester and running scores will be recorded. The pros and cons given to students will simulate different types of savings. Students will develop essential math skills while working to create a positive and lasting financial outcome as part of a happy life.
  • “Why are they doing this? “
    Abby Andries and Jessica Wetzel ($ 731.61).
    The grant establishes a resource library and database of storybooks, lessons and activities for use with students in person or virtually, as well as skill development and awareness of social, emotional and physical needs. of all.
  • Pickle Ball for PE
    Steve Simmons and Trisha Smart, Zionsville West Middle School ($ 1,293).
    The grant allows teachers at Zionsville West Middle School to introduce the fun and easy-to-learn sport of pickleball to all students at ZWMS. According to teachers, hand / eye coordination, balance, agility, and reflexes are all improved by lifelong sports practice.

Total grants awarded: $ 26,640.89


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Schools focus on basic skills to improve the chances of the poorest children https://www.scuolainsieme.com/schools-focus-on-basic-skills-to-improve-the-chances-of-the-poorest-children/ https://www.scuolainsieme.com/schools-focus-on-basic-skills-to-improve-the-chances-of-the-poorest-children/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 03:00:22 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/schools-focus-on-basic-skills-to-improve-the-chances-of-the-poorest-children/ At her primary school in Ndiebel, in western Senegal, Marietou Diagne has seen a marked improvement in her young students’ mastery of the basics of reading since she adopted a new teaching approach two years ago. Children in the first three years now study in Wolof, their mother tongue, before switching to French, the country’s […]]]>

At her primary school in Ndiebel, in western Senegal, Marietou Diagne has seen a marked improvement in her young students’ mastery of the basics of reading since she adopted a new teaching approach two years ago.

Children in the first three years now study in Wolof, their mother tongue, before switching to French, the country’s main language of instruction. On the basis of these stronger foundations, the aim is to improve children’s learning and progression through the education system.

“I have seen real progress,” says Diagne. “Children are much more comfortable and understand the essentials very quickly. They bring home books and their families can help them read. I’ve even had parents who said the younger ones were better at reading than their older siblings.

Primary school teacher Marietou Diagne

It is part of Lecture Pour Tous, a program aimed at improving basic reading skills in six regions of Senegal. It deploys a structured approach to learning that uses specially developed materials, regular assessments and training and coaching for teachers.

The underlying principle is that children learn best initially in the dominant language of their family, community and playground, rather than in the official language of their country, because that is what they know. the best. Initial evaluations suggest a significant improvement in reading skills for children enrolled in the three local languages ​​in which the program operates, compared to those starting their first years in French.

The program highlights the potential for innovative approaches to improve the very low levels of basic literacy and numeracy learning of hundreds of millions of children in low- and middle-income countries. Poor understanding leads to high dropout rates and limits the ability of those who remain to reach their full potential. It also illustrates the persistent barriers to improvement, which only intensified during the Covid-19 pandemic.

A teacher, holding a book, with his students inside the classroom

The Fatick school uses learning materials in the local language Serere) developed within the framework of Lecture Pour Tous

Reading For All is atypical in several respects. Although it operates in a country with historic ties to France which are reflected in its school system and choice of official languages, it is funded by the United States Agency for International Development, a federal agency that administers aid foreign. USAID stresses that there is no attempt to undermine the transition to teaching in French in later school years.

The program works closely with the government, enjoys strong long-term support, and has been sustained and expanded for several years with careful review and monitoring of results. This contrasts with many fragmented, poorly monitored, uncoordinated and unsustainable educational projects.

Ben Piper, senior director for education in Africa at RTI International, a nonprofit research institute, says he was able to identify less than a dozen similar examples in Asia and Africa for his research on ” large-scale programs with a significant impact on learning ”. In contrast, there are many small-scale pilot projects with insufficient evidence, providing little guidance as to whether or how they could be scaled up nationally, let alone replicated in other countries.

Students practice reading in their local language

Students practice reading in their local language

One of the successes is Pratham, a nonprofit organization active in India that has long championed an approach to improving learning – ‘teach at the right level’ – currently being explored elsewhere. It deploys simple, rapid and regular assessments of each child’s progress, coupled with structured instructional techniques to help teachers ensure children are fluent in reading.

“Once you know how to read with some understanding, you can propel yourself,” says Rukmini Banerji, Managing Director of Pratham. “You can’t do math, science or even follow [furniture assembly] instructions unless you can read.

She stresses the need for educators to “put aside the safety cover of a progression and curriculum based on age and grade level” in schools and instead focus on understanding the issues. basic fundamental skills for every child.

These techniques are receiving new attention as evidence of setbacks to learning caused by the coronavirus-related classroom closures, which has set children back in rich and poor countries alike in recent months. .

Banerji says Covid-19 prompted Pratham to step up efforts. Rather than just ‘connecting’ with out-of-school children, he tries to help them focus on formal learning. She sees a growing role for closer bonds between teachers and their families, using parents to help support learning outside of school.

Others point out that for many of the world’s poorest children, much broader measures will be needed, both to progress towards the UN goals of quality education for all and to recover from poverty. pandemic. These include steps well beyond the classroom to address the underlying causes and consequences of poverty and discrimination.

The charity Save the Children published a report in September entitled Build Forward Better, in which it stressed the importance of well-being and physical safety; target the children most discriminated against, including those who do not go to school; more funding; more decentralization of decision-making; and more regularly data collected and shared to improve decisions.

Raby Gueye is the head of Teach for Senegal, an education development organization that this year recruited its first cohort of talented young professionals to work in schools across the country, says broader support to hire, train and supporting high quality teachers is essential to improve outcomes. “We just don’t have a lot of time or resources dedicated to training,” she says.

She praises the shift with Lecture pour Tous towards teaching basic literacy and numeracy in local languages, but also stresses the importance of social and emotional skills and broader structural concerns. “We have kept a colonial system and we have never asked why it is in place. There must be a conversation about the purpose of education.


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Duc d’Anville Elementary School in Halifax to close next week due to the spread of COVID-19 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/duc-danville-elementary-school-in-halifax-to-close-next-week-due-to-the-spread-of-covid-19/ https://www.scuolainsieme.com/duc-danville-elementary-school-in-halifax-to-close-next-week-due-to-the-spread-of-covid-19/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 20:52:26 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/duc-danville-elementary-school-in-halifax-to-close-next-week-due-to-the-spread-of-covid-19/ Duc d’Anville Elementary School in Halifax will be closed next week to contain the spread of COVID-19 within the school, the province said on Friday. Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr Robert Strang made the recommendation following advice from local public health officials. Strang told a press conference on Friday that officials called for the […]]]>

Duc d’Anville Elementary School in Halifax will be closed next week to contain the spread of COVID-19 within the school, the province said on Friday.

Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr Robert Strang made the recommendation following advice from local public health officials.

Strang told a press conference on Friday that officials called for the closure after finding 14 cases at the school, which is in the Clayton Park neighborhood of Halifax.

He said the outbreak was attributed to a single employee whose job it was to go through the school. He did not add more details for confidentiality reasons.

Strang said the week-long shutdown should give authorities time to get the virus under control, but he doesn’t expect this to end the threat entirely.

“We can certainly expect that once the school reopens it is quite possible that we will have additional cases in the school,” he said. “That doesn’t mean this shutdown would have failed, it’s almost like the shutdown gives us the opportunity to reset and start over.”

Parents had pressured authorities for a closure for days.

Julia Zwicker’s four-year-old daughter Ava is in pre-primary at school.

She said principal Adam Griffin had wanted to close the school weeks ago for a deep clean, but nothing came of it.

Zwicker said she was glad they were closing it now, but didn’t want it to be closed for more than a week.

“I think it affects the social life of children when they are out of school,” she said.

Dave Kilgour has three children in school in years 1, 3 and 5.

“We think this is great news, we are a little shocked that it has taken so long,” he said.

“Duc is a very special school, we have a large Arabic population and we have seen that there has been a slower response to get translations into Arabic. [of public health information], and we have to fix it. “

Strang said officials are well aware of the cultural diversity surrounding the school.

“Everything we produce from Public Health has been translated into multiple languages,” he said.

“We also certainly hear that even in families where we have translated documents into a different language, a primary language for that family, there are also literacy issues.

“So we are working right now with, between public health, the school, the Immigrant Settlement Association of Nova Scotia, to really make sure that we are able to reach these families in the right language and the right kind of language. ‘information and level of information. “

Strang said that when the school reopens on October 18, students and staff will be required to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test. He said additional testing clinics will be set up next weekend in the region to facilitate the return to class.

Students will do home learning for the week.

COVID-19 vaccination clinics will also be set up in the community to encourage families to get vaccinated.

Concerns about the potential spread of the community to the Duke of Anville have recently been raised by parents and the teachers’ union.

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