covid pandemic – Scuola Insieme http://www.scuolainsieme.com/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 05:43:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T191058.566-150x150.png covid pandemic – Scuola Insieme http://www.scuolainsieme.com/ 32 32 Minneapolis teachers expected to leave work on Tuesday https://www.scuolainsieme.com/minneapolis-teachers-expected-to-leave-work-on-tuesday/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 04:39:12 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/minneapolis-teachers-expected-to-leave-work-on-tuesday/ ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Minneapolis school district teachers were scheduled to walk off the job Tuesday in a dispute over salaries, class sizes and student mental health support, at least temporarily halting classes for about 29,000 students in one of Minnesota’s largest school districts. Union members said they could not reach an agreement on […]]]>

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Minneapolis school district teachers were scheduled to walk off the job Tuesday in a dispute over salaries, class sizes and student mental health support, at least temporarily halting classes for about 29,000 students in one of Minnesota’s largest school districts.

Union members said they could not reach an agreement on wages, in particular a ‘living wage’ for education support professionals, as well as caps on class size and more services mental health for students.

“We’re going on strike…for the safe and stable schools our students deserve,” Greta Cunningham, president of the teachers’ chapter of the Minneapolis Federation of Teachers.

The school district called the news “disappointing” but pledged to “remain at the mediation table non-stop in an effort to reduce the duration and impact of this strike.”

Teachers in the nearby St. Paul School District, which has about 34,000 students, announced a tentative agreement late Monday night to avoid a strike that was also scheduled to begin Tuesday.

Union officials in both cities said the issues were largely the same. The St. Paul teachers’ union said its tentative agreement — subject to membership approval — includes maintaining caps on class size, increasing mental health supports and salary increases.

“This deal could have been done much sooner. There shouldn’t have been a strike vote, but we got there,” local union president Leah VanDassor said in an announcement of the deal.

St. Paul Superintendent Joe Gothard said the deals were fair while respecting district budget limits.

State mediators sought to facilitate negotiations between administrators and union leaders in the two districts. Districts had said virtually all classes would be canceled during a strike, although some school services and sports would continue.

National union leaders say teachers and support staff across the country are experiencing the same kinds of overwork and burnout issues due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but the Twin Cities districts are the only ones great on the verge of a strike. School district officials said they were already facing budget shortfalls due to enrollment losses resulting from the pandemic and could not spend the money they did not have.

The possibility of a strike weighed on parents already strained by the disruption of the pandemic.

Erin Zielinski’s daughter, Sybil, is a freshman at Armatage Community School in southwest Minneapolis. She and her husband support the teachers, although she questions whether the union’s demands are viable.

Zielinski said his family was lucky. She and her husband can count on their parents’ support during a strike, and although he had to return to the office, she still has some flexibility to work remotely. His plan in the event of a teachers’ strike? “Survival,” she laughs.

“You kind of become immune to it, between distance learning and homeschooling, it’s now a way of life, unfortunately,” she said. “My husband and I are going to put it back together.”

Earlier Monday, the Minneapolis district and its teachers seemed resigned to a walkout. The union, in a statement released earlier today, said the district is “not even pretending to avoid a strike.”

St. Paul’s union was more neutral in a statement saying it was considering a new offer that covered the issues with several of its proposals. Gothard outlined the proposals in a separate statement Sunday night, saying the district had offered to add language to the contract to keep average class sizes at their current levels, hire four additional school psychologists, a one-time cash payment $2,000 for each union employee using federal stimulus funds and to raise the salaries of the lowest paid education assistants.

“This comprehensive settlement offer meets union priorities, does not add to the projected budget shortfall of $42 million next year, and, most importantly, keeps our students, teachers and staff in the classroom,” said writes Gotthard.

Minneapolis has about 29,000 students and 3,265 teachers, while St. Paul has about 34,000 students and 3,250 educators. The average annual salary for teachers in St. Paul is over $85,000, while it is over $71,000 in Minneapolis. However, districts also employ hundreds of lower-paid support staff who often say they don’t earn a living wage, and these workers have been at the center of discussions.

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Associated Press writer Doug Glass contributed from Minneapolis.

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Learn to speak a new language – Albert Lea Tribune https://www.scuolainsieme.com/learn-to-speak-a-new-language-albert-lea-tribune/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 01:02:50 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/learn-to-speak-a-new-language-albert-lea-tribune/ Although the numbers have abandoned during COVID-19 pandemic, students continue their adult English as a second language program By Kelly Wassenberg The rules are everywhere. It is a means of ensuring order rather than chaos. They let people know what can be expected of them in certain situations. Unfortunately, the English language doesn’t care about […]]]>

Although the numbers have abandoned during COVID-19 pandemic, students continue their adult English as a second language program

By Kelly Wassenberg

The rules are everywhere. It is a means of ensuring order rather than chaos. They let people know what can be expected of them in certain situations.

Unfortunately, the English language doesn’t care about rules.

“That’s what’s hard about English,” said Betsy Schroeder, an ESL teacher at the Albert Lea Area Schools Adult Education Center. “Every time the English make a rule, they break it. And that’s the hard part is that [the students] are just starting to learn a rule, then they come across something that breaks that rule.

Schroeder and his students often laugh about it.

“Why do we make rules if we break them? ” she says.

Schroeder has been an ESL teacher for 23 years and teaches advanced students ESL.

Penny Jahnke, adult education coordinator, said the program served 141 students from 16 countries covering 11 different languages ​​- the most popular of which is Karen followed by Spanish. Students are ages 16 and up and their education levels vary widely.

Some come from countries where women are uneducated and don’t even know the alphabet. Others have degrees in their home countries, but need a better understanding of the English language to be able to use that knowledge in a career here in the United States.

Most of the students are refugees, including Rau Htoo, 38, and Shay Lay Moo, 20.

Htoo is a refugee from Myanmar, who spent 10 years in a refugee camp before coming to the United States. This is her second year of the program.

Htoo said his decision to come to the United States was based on the opportunities the country has to offer and that he was able to learn some English before immigrating to the country.

“America is a good place for refugees,” Htoo said.

Htoo is one of many who work full time in addition to coming to class to improve his understanding of English in all its forms – spoken, written and read.

Moo was born in a refugee camp on the Thai-Myanmar border. While she received an education, English was not taught at the camp. She works in the community and learns English in hopes of getting a better job to support her family. She has been in the ESL program for five years.

It takes a lot of dedication for ESL students to stick to the curriculum.

“We have students who work 10-hour shifts and then come to school,” Jahnke said. “These students coming to the school are probably some of the hardest working and most dedicated students you can find.”

Of those currently enrolled in the program, she said 61% of students work full-time, with many of the rest staying home to raise their children while their spouses work.

Whatever their situation, the adult basic education program tries to eliminate all possible obstacles by offering them both transport and childcare assistance. Computers and mobile hotspots are also available so students can also learn at their own pace.

Classes are Monday through Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. work. Since COVID hit, Schroeder said his class attendance has dropped from 16 to at times a handful, but Jahnke said they’re working on ways to adapt. They plan to offer evening classes as part of a consortium and have worked on a highly flexible model.

“We have students sitting at home, zooming in and watching the class, while the teacher is also teaching a student sitting in front of her, and it’s been very successful,” she said.

Flexibility is important as students must log between 40 and 50 hours of classroom instruction before taking the test to advance to the next level. There are six levels in total – three in the beginner classes and three in the advanced class.

“The immigrant population contributes to Albert Lea and Freeborn County,” Jahnke said. “They occupy jobs in our production plants. They buy houses. They bring their children to our schools. I only see positive things in people who come here. They are hard working and very family oriented.

Say what? Grammar Rules/Exceptions for ESL

There are many common spelling rules that most are familiar with, but there are exceptions. Thinking about these rules, it becomes easier to imagine why a non-English speaker might have difficulty mastering the language. Here are a few.

  • I before E except after C — or when the letter combination sounds A — like weigh and neighbor. There are still exceptions to this exception as the pitch EI does not ring the A.
  • If C is followed by E, I, or Y, it usually gives the sound S, such as cell, circle, or cynic; but if the C is followed by an A, O, or U, it will usually sound K, such as car, cold, or cue. The same rule applies to the letter G, which sounds the J in words like gem, giant, and gymnasium, but sounds the G in words like gage, go, and guerilla. There are exceptions to these rules, including the word girl which sounds the G instead of the J.
  • When two vowels walk, the first speaks, like dream, pain and peeling. Exceptions include bread, poem, and guest.
  • When pluralizing a noun that ends in Y, change Y to I and add ES, like penny to pennies, the exception is if the Y is preceded by a vowel. Boy only needs an S to make it plural.
  • When pluralizing a word that ends in F, the F is replaced by a V and an ES is added, like elf/elves and bread/loaves. However, if a word ends in a double FF, such as riff, only an S is needed to pluralize the word.
  • VCV stands for vowel-consonant-vowel. In words like these, the second vowel is silent and causes the first vowel to say its name as in words like cake, made, and bike. Exceptions to the rule include the word lemon, derived from the French.
  • Some words ending in O have an ES added to them when pluralized, but not all. For example, potato turns into potatoes, but the word photo turns into photos.
  • For many words, the Y ending must be replaced by I when a suffix is ​​added. Funny becomes funnier and ready becomes easily, but there are exceptions like shy becoming shy.
  • Removing the E is a fairly consistent rule when adding suffixes for words such as writing becoming writing and meaning becoming sensible. Exceptions occur in words ending in CE or GE in which the C or G sounds remain soft as brave and noticeable.
  • The pluralization of animals can be quite confusing for those who are not native to the English language.
  • Deer remains deer in the plural, as do fish, sheep and moose. The mouse becomes a mouse. Beef becomes beef. The goose becomes a goose. To pluralize octopus and hippo, the words change to octopus and hippo, or you can add an es to make octopus and hippo. Either is correct.
  • When nouns end in ch, sh, ss, x, or z, the letter combination of ES is used to indicate pluralization, such as ranges, wishes, or boxes. There are exceptions to this rule such as stomachs and monarchs. This exception applies when the CH emits a K sound.
  • The 1-1-1 rule states that when words in a syllable ending in a single consonant immediately preceded by a single vowel, double the consonant before a suffixed vowel, such as running or jogging. This rule does not apply to words ending in V, W or X.
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Previous Business English Training Market Research, In-Depth Analysis and Current Data with Berlitz, Sanako – Business Ethics https://www.scuolainsieme.com/previous-business-english-training-market-research-in-depth-analysis-and-current-data-with-berlitz-sanako-business-ethics/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 08:19:45 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/previous-business-english-training-market-research-in-depth-analysis-and-current-data-with-berlitz-sanako-business-ethics/ A2Z Market Research has published a new study on Global Business English Training covering Micro Level of Analysis by Competitors and Key Business Segments (2022-2029). Global Business English education explores in-depth study on various segments such as opportunities, size, development, innovation, sales and global growth of key players. The research is carried out on primary […]]]>

A2Z Market Research has published a new study on Global Business English Training covering Micro Level of Analysis by Competitors and Key Business Segments (2022-2029). Global Business English education explores in-depth study on various segments such as opportunities, size, development, innovation, sales and global growth of key players. The research is carried out on primary and secondary statistical sources and consists of qualitative and quantitative details.

Get sample PDF report + all related charts and graphs @:

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Some of the major key vendor profiled in this report are Berlitz, Sanako, TAL Education Group, EF Education First, Rosetta Stone, Pearson ELT, Pearson ELT, EF Education First, ChinaEDU, New Oriental Education & Technology Group, Inlingua

Since analytics has become an integral part of every business activity and role, the central role in today’s business decision-making process is mentioned in this report. Over the next few years, the market demand is expected to increase significantly globally, enabling healthy growth of the Business English Training Market is also detailed in the report. This report highlights that the cost structure of manufacturing includes material cost, labor cost, depreciation cost, and cost of manufacturing procedures. Pricing analysis and analysis of equipment vendors are also done by the analysts of the report.

This research report presents a 360-degree overview of the serious business English training market scene. Also, it offers gigantic information about late regimens, innovative progressions, devices, and procedures. The review report examines the business English training market point-by-point and succinctly for better experiences in organizations.

The report, using quick and dirty company profiles, project reasonableness investigation, SWOT assessment, and experience or two on major associations working in the training market in business English, shows a logical point-by-point record of the market. cut-throat situation. The report additionally presents a survey of the impact of late progress in the market on the future opportunities for improvement in the market.

Global Business English Training Market Segmentation:

Market Segmentation: By Type

Connected disconnected

Market Segmentation: By Application

School children, students, working adults, others

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The global business English training market is spread across North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Middle East & Africa, and Rest of the World.

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The accessibility of labor is apparently upsetting the stock organization of the global business English training market as the lockdown and the spread of the disease push people to stay indoors. The introduction of the creators of Business English Language Training and the transport of the elements are linked. In the event of a halt in the development of the collection, the transport and, likewise, the network of stores also come to a halt. The stacking and unloading of objects, i.e. materials and raw results (trims), which require a huge workload, are also impacted enthusiastically due to the pandemic. From the door of the collection factory to the reserve or from the place of dissemination to the end customers, that is to say, to the adventures of application, the whole organization of the stock of business English training is truly compromised in reason for the episode.

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Scotland to start drone trials in March https://www.scuolainsieme.com/scotland-to-start-drone-trials-in-march/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 12:16:59 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/scotland-to-start-drone-trials-in-march/ Scotland’s Mercury Drone Ports programme, which aims to develop the drone industry in Angus, will begin medical logistics trials in partnership with the UK’s National Health Service (NHS) from next month. The program, which is a partnership between drone technology start-up DTLX and Angus Council, will operate the trials from its drone port in the […]]]>

Scotland’s Mercury Drone Ports programme, which aims to develop the drone industry in Angus, will begin medical logistics trials in partnership with the UK’s National Health Service (NHS) from next month.

The program, which is a partnership between drone technology start-up DTLX and Angus Council, will operate the trials from its drone port in the town of Montrose.

The operator will transport medical equipment and samples to and from several health facilities between Angus and the city of Dundee, to help with the response to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Speaking to the Scotsman newspaper, Angus council chief adviser David Fairweather said: ‘This level of improvement could potentially allow life-saving treatment to start sooner by reducing test times, speeding up diagnoses for patients, all at a reduced cost to the NHS by reducing reliance on the expensive taxi transport that currently exists.

“As the significant demands for Covid-19 testing continue, we are delighted to be leading the way in innovative technologies to increase connectivity with our rural facilities, at a time when the NHS needs greater support. “

The program could offer significant improvements to connectivity in Scotland

Drone logistics technology could give a significant boost to connectivity across Scotland – a country known for its rugged terrain and sparsely populated northern regions.

The program is receiving funding under the UK government’s £26.5 million Angus Fund, as part of the Tay Cities Regional Deal. It is hoped the scheme will encourage innovation in the city and boost jobs in Scotland’s tech sector.

“Drones have huge potential in Scotland, from connecting health services to remote communities, to helping maintain renewable energy installations, to helping with Scottish aquaculture and monitoring environment,” said UK Government Minister for Scotland Iain Stewart.

Medical logistics drone projects have become more common in recent years as the technology is tested in remote parts of the world, including the United States, Peru, Nigeria and Ivory Coast.

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Michael Hicks: Some surprising lessons from COVID learning loss – The Daily Reporter https://www.scuolainsieme.com/michael-hicks-some-surprising-lessons-from-covid-learning-loss-the-daily-reporter/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/michael-hicks-some-surprising-lessons-from-covid-learning-loss-the-daily-reporter/ Michael Hicks Last month, my colleague Dagney Faulk and I published a study on COVID-related learning loss in Indiana schools (available at https://projects.cberdata.org). The results were surprising and largely positive – or, at least, more promising than I expected. The aim of this work was to better understand which factors contribute to learning loss. What […]]]>

Last month, my colleague Dagney Faulk and I published a study on COVID-related learning loss in Indiana schools (available at https://projects.cberdata.org). The results were surprising and largely positive – or, at least, more promising than I expected. The aim of this work was to better understand which factors contribute to learning loss. What we know so far has mostly been limited to simple descriptive statistics about changes in test scores. It’s a good start, but it can’t speak of correlation, let alone causation on learning loss. To do this, more math is needed.

In a perfect world, we would have detailed student data over time. In the absence of this, school-level data provide a fairly good basis for assessing the effects of COVID and school-level responses to the pandemic on learning loss. Our aim was to examine how children of different age groups passed the same standardized test before and after COVID. This approach, coupled with statistical modeling, dodges most of the well-known criticisms of standardized tests.

We looked at all public schools, grades 3-8 in 2019 and 2021, the great COVID disruption. During this period, the middle school saw pass rates on standardized math and English tests drop by more than 10%. Some schools have actually done better due to COVID, but the vast majority have not. A handful of schools have even seen a 50% drop in pass rates.

In the best-performing schools, most children failed math and English tests. At worst, about half of the classrooms would have no students who passed both tests. This is frightening data that potentially affects educational attainment and long-term economic growth. Just so no one arbitrarily dismisses the past 18 months, I’m willing to place a $1,000 bet that the learning loss of this age cohort will still be evident in the 2060 census. The only question is how much will this loss be and what compensating factors, such as resilience and courage, will replace the classroom competence of these students.

Our statistical models that test for learning loss allow us to measure each variable together. In this way, we control several differences at the same time. For example, in crude comparisons offered by the Indiana Department of Education last summer, African-American students suffered more learning losses, as did poor children. However, when we control for both race and poverty, the statistical significance of race disappears.

Another way to explain this is that two schools with different racial mixes but the same level of poverty experienced the same level of learning loss. Our study could not tell which aspect of poverty caused the learning loss, but there are many potential factors such as lack of broadband access for distance learning. This should be fertile ground for research for years to come.

Our second big finding is that schools that performed better on standardized tests in 2019 experienced greater learning loss from COVID. We believe this is due to specialized programs in higher performing schools that were not easily executed during COVID. There are many other plausible contributing factors, so it may take some time before causes are identified.

The rest of our findings were really “non-findings” in that most of the differences between schools that we could measure were not correlated with learning loss. Race and ethnicity did not play a role in learning loss, nor did the share of English learners. The type of school did not matter, whether it was elementary, intermediate or combined. The size of the school did not matter, nor did absenteeism throughout the year. There was some evidence that declining enrollment increased learning loss, but this is a small effect.

The big surprise was that the combination of teaching – in-person, online or hybrid – had no effect on learning loss. This differs from the raw numbers shared by the Department of Education, but again without controlling for other factors, these comparisons offer no useful interpretation. I think the explanation for this result is quite simple.

Hoosier schools, like many others across the country, have struggled with scheduling and education decisions throughout the 2020-2021 school year. There is no doubt that each superintendent and school board has struggled to juggle several different priorities such as health, learning and enrollment. But, ultimately, most decisions could be reduced to two trade-offs: learning loss due to online learning or learning loss due to quarantine and isolation. Here’s how it works.

Suppose schools that have chosen to go fully online minimize the spread of disease in the school, but maximize learning loss from online learning. Alternatively, schools that accepted the COVID risk and went entirely in-person minimized learning loss from online learning. However, in doing so, they would have suffered more learning losses due to quarantine and isolation of students and staff. Either way, there is a risk of learning loss. The trade-off was not between health and learning, but between two different types of learning loss.

This is where statistical modeling of this type is so badly needed to understand how these policies have affected learning. If, on average, Indiana schools misjudged this trade-off and spent too much time in online instruction, or too much time in person, that would show up in our statistical model. But if, on average, schools were effectively balancing instructional metrics throughout the year, no specific type of instructional form would be correlated with learning loss.

Of the dozens of statistical tests we performed, none indicated a correlation between learning loss and the teaching setting. This is a total and complete rejection of the scientific hypothesis that there is a correlation between these modes of instruction – in-person, online or hybrid – and learning loss in Indiana.

This is an important finding for schools, policy makers and taxpayers. The COVID pandemic has been a difficult time for schools. While I believe the Holcomb administration provided clear and consistent guidance, the CDC’s federal communications could hardly have been more confusing. Federal failures have helped fuel mistrust and frustration that have surely made educational decisions very difficult for school boards and superintendents.

There are undoubtedly many lessons to be learned from COVID, and some schools have done better than others. But with the data and analysis available on learning loss, schools in Indiana seem to have done about as well as they can. This should give the rest of us great confidence that they will tackle the problem of learning loss with the same good judgment.

Michael J. Hicks is director of the Center for Business and Economic Research and the George and Frances Ball Distinguished Professor of Economics at Ball State University’s Miller College of Business. His column appears in Indiana newspapers.

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The pearl loses its luster https://www.scuolainsieme.com/the-pearl-loses-its-luster/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/the-pearl-loses-its-luster/ Sunnier Days: Tourists sunbathe on Nai Han Beach. Phuket, like any attraction, relies on a positive image with potential visitors. However, such an image is still likely to be marred by high-profile crimes as well as a perceived lack of security. Recent news reports of crimes on the island have put the reputation of the […]]]>

Sunnier Days: Tourists sunbathe on Nai Han Beach.

Phuket, like any attraction, relies on a positive image with potential visitors. However, such an image is still likely to be marred by high-profile crimes as well as a perceived lack of security.

Recent news reports of crimes on the island have put the reputation of the “Pearl of the Andaman” on the line. And they have arrived at the least opportune moment given that the island province has positioned itself as a main engine to revive the tourist sector of the country battered by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Provincial authorities have taken stock of the incidents and are moving quickly to address them to control the impacts on Phuket tourism, which is paving the way for the wider industry to restart in the country.

“We need to maintain a welcoming image. We have tried to prevent any setback to our reputation. Sometimes we succeed, other times we don’t,” said Pichet Panapong, deputy governor of Phuket.

negative publicity

Since the middle of last month, negative publicity has dominated the headlines, ranging from the overcharging of taxi fares, the theft of €5,000 (about 200,000 baht) from a family of Greek tourists and a scam at a call center that went after a Swiss who lost 57,000 baht.

But Phuket’s image as a safe tourist haven took an even bigger blow two weeks ago when an Indian gangster, Jimi Singh Sandhu, also known as Mandeep Singh, was gunned down outside his villa on Rawai Beach on February 4. Her body was discovered the next morning.

Phuket’s episode of bad press began on August 3 last year with the murder of Nicole Sauvain-Weisskopf, 57, deputy chief of protocol for the Federal Assembly of Switzerland.

Teerawat Thothip, 27, was arrested four days later after police found Weisskopf’s half-naked body at Ton Ao Yon waterfall two days earlier.

Police say the suspect admitted to sexually assaulting the woman after spotting her alone at the waterfall. However, she fought back so he drowned her, then covered her with a plastic sheet before stealing 300 baht from her.

Weisskopf’s murder came just over a month after Phuket reopened under the sandbox tourism scheme on July 1.

The incident touched a sore nerve for state agencies and frontline tourism businesses that had glimpsed a modest but sustained recovery in tourism following the reopening.

Authorities’ concerns grew after criminal cases spiked even as police worked hard to solve them.

The cases have seriously shaken the confidence of tourists, so much so that high-ranking police have traveled to Phuket to look into the investigation themselves. The Sandhu case prompted National Police Chief Suwat Jangyodsuk to travel to the province to follow up on the investigation.

Police said they have identified the suspects and warrants have been issued for their arrest.

Phuket has led the way by being the first province to “experiment” with reopening tourism.

From July 1 last year to February 10, 299,305 tourists visited the province, including those who registered in the country through the Test & Go program which offers an easy alternative to quarantine for fully vaccinated visitors.

Tourist arrivals to Phuket are expected to increase in the coming months.

At the same time, Warner Brothers’ Deep Blue Production moved its filming location from The Meg 2: The Trench film from Krabi to Phuket. The film will be shot from April 1 to May 15.

Early last week, the filmmakers sat down with Mr. Pichet to discuss the production, which is set to shoot in Tambon Patong.

Mr. Pichet acknowledged that crime was one of the biggest problems in the tourism industry. Yet the sooner the suspects are caught, the sooner the damage to Phuket’s tourist reputation can be contained.

Problems persist

Phuket Governor Narong Woonciew said officials had addressed many issues. For example, the issue of taxis was being dealt with by officials of the Deputy Prime Minister and land transport offices with the help of private transport operators.

As for the robbery case involving the family of Greek tourists, some residents rallied to their aid and donated money to the victims, which shows the hosts’ compassion for their guests.

Overcharged taxi fares have long been a problem for tourism in Phuket. Despite all the efforts of the authorities to eradicate it, tourists continue to file complaints.

The question has sometimes reached its climax with fights between customers and taxi drivers, tuk tuk or motorcycle taxis.

Customers say the rates charged by drivers are arbitrary and unfair. The issue was raised by foreign diplomats who met with the governor of the province.

On January 28, a wealthy Thai tourist said he was charged 600 baht by a taxi for a 20-minute ride from Kamala Beach to Patong Beach.

The Land Transport Bureau then fined the taxi driver 2,000 baht. The driver also received demerits and was sent for retraining.

In July 2019, two Australian tourists filed a complaint against the driver of a public van who charged them 3,000 baht for a traffic-free 50km journey from the airport to their hotel.

Standardized tariffs

Jaturong Kaewkasi, head of the Phuket land transport office, told the Bangkok Post that tariffs were standardized across the province and that tariffs could be downloaded from the office’s website. Customers can always call the office hotline on 1584 24 hours a day.

“We listened to all parties before arriving at standard fares suitable for travel to Phuket. Fares may vary from other provinces,” he said.

The application known as Hello Phuket Service has been approved by the Department of Land Transport. Additionally, more metered taxis will come into service and offer fares that customers and drivers can agree on.

A source at a private transport company suggested that all modes of public transport in Phuket should be allowed to pick up customers at the airport to create competition. It would also deter unscrupulous practices in the transport sector.

Taxis should be prohibited from charging extra to pick up customers at the airport.

Mr Pichet said using an app to call taxis and display an estimated fare will make travel fairer and cheaper.

fake news

Kongsak Khoopongsakorn, chairman of the Thai Hotel Association, Southern Chapter, expressed concern about the overall image of the province. Stories about the taxi fare fiasco and local murders have been playing out on social media.

He said the high taxi fares were difficult to manage. Drivers picking up customers from the airport claim they have to charge double the normal fare because, coming from the city, they are only allowed to drop customers off at the airport but not pick up new ones from there.

He said some web pages have caused a stir on Phuket transport to stir up the hype. Some even make up incidents in an attempt to drive a wedge between Phuket taxi drivers and tourists.

Mr Kongsak said the killings that took place in Phuket stemmed from personal disputes. When they go out of their way to conjure up a false image of Phuket as a dangerous tourist destination, the province and its tourism industry suffer.

“I call on the government to take a strong stance. Illegal weapons must be eliminated and suspects must be brought to justice in a timely manner.

“Everyone has a role to play in being a good host,” he said.

Kongsak said tourist arrivals have stabilized in the province since February 1, with 2,000 to 3,000 tourists entering Phuket daily. Hotel occupancy rates are hovering between 30 and 40 percent, although that number will start to drop next week.

“But we still see a silver lining with Thai tourists,” he said, adding that domestic tourists are expected to take advantage of Phase 4 of the Rao Tiew Duay Kan (We Travel Together) co-pay program and head to Phuket.

Single master plan

Sonthaya Kongthip, chairman of the Baan Bangtao-Cherngtalay Tourism Community Enterprise, said Phuket needs to follow a common master plan at the local level so that every stakeholder is aware of the strengths and weaknesses of local tourism.

The master plan should emphasize equity in the conduct of tourism activities, should ensure that tourists are treated fairly and ensure that tourism revenues are distributed more equitably.

“We have to put ourselves in our visitors’ shoes. It’s part of the charm of Phuket,” he said.

Mr Sonthaya said a consultative approach might work better to solve difficult problems. For example, tourists should be asked what public transport fares they are willing to pay before fares are set, taking into account the mountainous geography of the province which is a factor in fuel consumption.

Regarding taxi fares, he suggested holding a forum where public transport drivers could fully express their views.

Meanwhile, Pheu Thai MP for Bangkok, Anudit Nakhonthap, urged the government to quickly repair Phuket’s image and avoid further negative effects on tourism recovery.

One way to solve the problem was to recruit more tourism police, as there are only 1,800 in the whole country, he said.

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ComfortDelGro to Raise Flagdown Taxi Fare by $0.20 to Maintain Drivers’ Livelihoods https://www.scuolainsieme.com/comfortdelgro-to-raise-flagdown-taxi-fare-by-0-20-to-maintain-drivers-livelihoods/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 05:37:18 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/comfortdelgro-to-raise-flagdown-taxi-fare-by-0-20-to-maintain-drivers-livelihoods/ ComfortDelGro Announces Taxi Fare Increases August 2 Although public transport remains the most economical travel option for most, some of us may prefer to hail a taxi or private hire vehicle to save time. Shooting down a ComfortDelGro taxi will be slightly more expensive next month. On Tuesday (February 8), the company announced price increases […]]]>

ComfortDelGro Announces Taxi Fare Increases August 2

Although public transport remains the most economical travel option for most, some of us may prefer to hail a taxi or private hire vehicle to save time.

Shooting down a ComfortDelGro taxi will be slightly more expensive next month.

On Tuesday (February 8), the company announced price increases for downtime rates, distance rates and wait times.

It is their first price adjustment in a decade, which is needed to help taxi drivers cope with rising operating costs and inflation.

ComfortDelGro’s taxi fare hike is the first in 10 years

In one press release Tuesday (February 8)CDG has announced a series of price increases that will take place from 6 a.m. on March 1:

  • Flagdown fares: $0.20 increase for all taxis
  • Fares based on distance: increase of $0.02 for normal taxis; $0.03 increase for limousines
  • Waiting time (per 45 seconds): $0.02 surcharge for regular taxis; $0.03 increase for limousines

CDG estimates that the price increases will result in an increase of around 7.7% in fares for a regular 10 km taxi ride during off-peak hours.

According to CDG, this is the first price change in 10 years, since December 2011.

Taxi operating costs are rising due to inflation and fuel prices

Justifying the fare increase, CDG says taxi drivers have faced higher operating costs due to rising fuel prices and inflation.

Over the past 6 months, fuel prices have reportedly increased by around 10% on average.

In contrast, inflation has increased by nearly 12% over the past decade.

CDG taxi drivers have seen their income drop throughout the pandemic, despite the aid granted by the government and CDG.

Therefore, the price change is deemed necessary to help taxi drivers retain their rice bowls.

Support our taxi drivers

In a healthy economy, it is natural for prices to rise gradually over time.

However, events like the Covid-19 pandemic disproportionately affect taxi drivers. As a result, this makes tariff hikes essential for them to earn a decent living.

While the price change is likely to be unpopular, we hope members of the public can approach it with empathy and put themselves in the shoes of our taxi drivers.

Do you have news to share? Contact us by email at news@mustsharenews.com.

Image featured by MS News.

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Opinion: Public health officials must be held accountable for their decisions about reopening schools https://www.scuolainsieme.com/opinion-public-health-officials-must-be-held-accountable-for-their-decisions-about-reopening-schools/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 17:01:14 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/opinion-public-health-officials-must-be-held-accountable-for-their-decisions-about-reopening-schools/ As legendary baseball catcher Yogi Berra once said, “it’s deja vu again.” Quebec’s decision to reopen schools on Jan. 17 has many pundits and parents shaking their heads in disbelief. This defies scientific logic as COVID-19 hospital, ICU admissions and deaths have reached record highs, while critical issues such as school ventilation and effective masking […]]]>

As legendary baseball catcher Yogi Berra once said, “it’s deja vu again.”

Quebec’s decision to reopen schools on Jan. 17 has many pundits and parents shaking their heads in disbelief. This defies scientific logic as COVID-19 hospital, ICU admissions and deaths have reached record highs, while critical issues such as school ventilation and effective masking strategies are overlooked or downplayed.

This coincided incongruously with the Minister of Health Christian Dubé telling us “We are almost at the point of no return”, that stage 4 “load shedding” may no longer be enough and that we should see more critical surgeries canceled, something unthinkable in a few weeks. There are.

To make matters worse, the situation in Quebec hospitals is now the most critical of all G7 countries.

Most agree that children should go to school, but above all schools should be safe and healthy.

Children do not live in isolation. If they get sick, they can very well transmit the virus to other family members, the community and possibly to the most vulnerable.

International and Canadian studies have documented transmission from children.

What the Premier of Quebec, François Legault, is proposing falls far short of Ontario’s plan to go all out with the widespread installation of air purifiers/exchangers in every classroom, school cafeteria and gymnasium, as well as than providing N-95 masks to teachers, among other protections. measures.

The Legault government justified its inaction with inaccurate claims that “there is no ventilation problem in schools”, that “SARS-Cov-2 is only transmitted marginally via aerosols”, that ” there is no significant transmission from schools to the community”, that “the rapid tests were too unreliable”.

The real problem is that similar fallacious arguments are still being used by Quebec leaders and public health officials today as they have been since the start of the pandemic despite all the scientific evidence to the contrary.

What is particularly infuriating is the continued infantilization of the population by using simplistic and specious statements unsupported by scientific data, coupled with a paternalistic attitude towards the “inept” masses.

Left to fend for themselves, some school boards have felt compelled to purchase air purifiers as a stopgap measure. Caught off guard, Quebec public health officials falsely claimed that air purifiers “could be dangerous” if improperly installed or maintained.

Contrary to claims by Quebec Ministry of Health experts that portable HEPA air purifiers have not been shown to be effective in preventing airborne disease transmission, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of United States recommends their use, especially in high-risk areas, as does the Canadian Public Health Agency.

Indeed, two recent NASA and CDC studies found that HEPA-equipped purification systems were extremely effective at capturing virus-sized particles and actually reduced the spread of COVID-19 in schools.

Quebec’s answer is that air exchangers are better than air purifiers because they remove stale air and replace it with outside air, which is true in many situations, but they are more expensive and complex to install, whereas air purifiers can be professionally installed the same day.

However, effective risk mitigation strategies, especially in times of imminent danger, require immediate action.

So why didn’t Quebec offer the air exchanger option to all school boards last year? Why have English school boards been left on their own to buy air purifiers and denied any public health guidance? How is the $432 million in federal funds allocated to improve air quality in schools being used?

Belatedly, Quebec now distributes carbon dioxide (CO2) readers to 70% of schools. Such monitors may indicate when opening windows (an unrealistic option on cold winter days) or evacuating a room is indicated to reduce the risk of airborne transmission of SARS-Cov-2, but they do not prevent the underlying cause. of viral transmission because they don’t. purify or refresh the air in a room.

The best anti-COVID strategy is to invest heavily in air exchangers and air purifiers. Currently, only 500 air exchangers are available for the entire province, a drop in the ocean of 48,000 classrooms.

After decades of neglect, inadequate ventilation systems in Quebec schools are a major health issue in the current pandemic.

We cannot wait years for much-needed repairs. To mitigate the COVID-19 pandemic, air exchangers and HEPA fans are the short-term solution required. Quebec knows that a majority of schools do not comply with American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) filtration/air exchange standards for schools to reduce SARS-Cov -2 airborne.

Recently, the media reported on the loss of confidence in Dr. Horacio Arruda, alleging that he lacked autonomy from his political leaders and merely acted as a cover for them. The arrival of Dr. Luc Boileau as the new interim director of public health meant potential hope for science-based policies.

Unfortunately, his first decision at work was to give the green light for schools to reopen on January 17.

Boileau repeated the same trope that goes against the scientific consensus, that “there is no evidence that schools amplify the transmission of COVID-19 to the community,” brushing aside international and Canadian studies that say the opposite. He dismissed Quebec’s own data, which showed a disproportionate increase in outbreaks in elementary schools from September to December 2021. It was only very recently, on January 19, that he reluctantly underestimated that the opening of schools could induce “a little” more transmission.

Dr. Boileau already gives us an unpleasant feeling of deja vu.

As Quebec’s public health leaders and officials flagrantly deviate from science and precautionary principles, an increasingly skeptical media has reached out to doctors and scientists working in the field of healthcare and academia for more reliable and trustworthy information.

We don’t have the same high expectations of politicians that we have of physicians working in public health. These health professionals have enormous responsibilities and their conduct must be exemplary.

Public health physicians must be held accountable to the same quality and ethical standards as those who work in the clinical field and who can face serious consequences if they fail in their duty to provide quality care to their patients according to the best available medical standards.

This has never been truer than now.

Michael Levy, MPH (Master of Public Health), environmental health specialist and epidemiologist

Michel Camus, Ph.D., Environmental Health Epidemiologist (retired)

Nancy Delagrave, physicist, scientific coordinator of Covid-Stop

Stéphane Bilodeau, P.Eng., Ph.D., FIC, Indoor Air Quality Task Force Coordinator, Global Health Network

Nimâ Machouf, Ph.D., epidemiologist, consultant in infectious diseases, lecturer at the School of Public Health of the University of Montreal

Pierre-Jules Tremblay, Eng.

Donald Vinh, MD, infectious disease specialist and medical microbiologist

Marie Jobin, PhD, organizational psychology

Steve Tremblay, occupational health and safety consultant

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More drivers wanted as taxi and ride-hailing traffic rebounds https://www.scuolainsieme.com/more-drivers-wanted-as-taxi-and-ride-hailing-traffic-rebounds/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 07:58:49 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/more-drivers-wanted-as-taxi-and-ride-hailing-traffic-rebounds/ SINGAPORE – The number of taxi and private hire car journeys appears on track to return to the highest levels since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic in February 2020, with ridership figures rebounding at the end of last year as the government eased pandemic measures. Figures from the Land Transport Authority (LTA) show average […]]]>

SINGAPORE – The number of taxi and private hire car journeys appears on track to return to the highest levels since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic in February 2020, with ridership figures rebounding at the end of last year as the government eased pandemic measures.

Figures from the Land Transport Authority (LTA) show average daily taxi and private hire car journeys increased by almost 30,000 journeys to 563,000 in November, coinciding with a relaxation of Covid-19 measures that have allowed social groups of up to five to meet outdoors and dine in restaurants.

Although December figures are still being processed by authorities, taxi and ride-sharing operators have said passenger numbers that month are expected to be close to 600,000, or 80% of what they were. before Covid-19.

The festive season, coupled with greater certainty about the Omicron variant, prompted many people to leave. The previous pandemic peak was also reached in December 2020, with 610,000 movements per day.

But this recovery is accompanied by a contrary trend. As has been the case for the past two years, the number of drivers on the roads has continued to decline.

The taxi population in November stood at 81% of pre-Covid-19 levels. Private rental cars accounted for 88% of this figure in 2019.

Ms Yeo Wan Ling, an adviser to the National Taxi Association (NTA) and the National Private Hire Vehicles Association (NPHVA), said the industry was optimistic about the new year.

“We hope there may be increased demand for taxi services and private hire cars now that working from home is no longer the norm and more employees are expected to travel to their offices,” a- she added.

“As the economy recovers, we expect ridership to eventually return to pre-Covid-19 levels.”

At its lowest during the May 2020 circuit breaker, ridership in taxis and private rental vehicles fell to 26% of that of 2019.

It then gradually recovered and sought to return to 2019 levels until the Delta variant emerged and the government reimposed heightened alert measures in May.

Among these was a reduction in the size of social groups from five to two people. Meals in restaurants have also been halted due to the risk of transmission from unmasked diners.

In November, after the overall number of infections stabilized and hospitals were not overwhelmed, some of the measures were eased.

ComfortDelGro Taxi, Singapore’s largest taxi operator with 10,000 taxis, said taxi ridership increased by 5.4% last year compared to 2020.

He sent out a Facebook post calling on new drivers to join his ranks as demand grew, offering them up to $5,500 in incentives.

He also confirmed that taxi bookings on his app were up 25% month-on-month in December last year. On December 17, it recorded the highest number of trips of the whole year.

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Listen to South African scientists on omicron https://www.scuolainsieme.com/listen-to-south-african-scientists-on-omicron/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://www.scuolainsieme.com/listen-to-south-african-scientists-on-omicron/ [ad_1] “You have to empower people by telling them what’s going on, but I have a feeling that some British scientists didn’t want to use the word ‘light’, they just want to use the word ‘severe’.” His suspicions appear to be borne out by the language used by the SPI-MO modeling committee, which said on […]]]>


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“You have to empower people by telling them what’s going on, but I have a feeling that some British scientists didn’t want to use the word ‘light’, they just want to use the word ‘severe’.”

His suspicions appear to be borne out by the language used by the SPI-MO modeling committee, which said on December 7: “Currently, there is no strong evidence that omicron infections are more or less severe than delta infections. “

Sage also avoided the use of the word “mild,” noting on Dec. 16 that “it is still too early to reliably assess the severity of the disease caused by omicron compared to previous variants. Preliminary analysis from South Africa suggests that this wave may be less severe than previous waves, a comparison of […]cases within this wave suggest less difference between the variants.

“Some severity estimates should start to be available in about a week […] even if there were to be a modest reduction in severity from the delta, a very high number of infections would still put significant pressure on hospitals. “

Laura Dodsworth, author of A State of Fear: How the UK Government Weaponized Fear during the Covid-19 Pandemic, says the “language manipulation” was entirely deliberate.

“The omission of the word ‘light’ is no accident,” she said. “The problem for the government is that once you start using fear as a tactic, there is nowhere to go, so you have to keep using it and you have to keep citing the worst case scenarios. .

“But every time you do it, the tactic becomes less effective because people are getting wise. Once you see the smoke and the mirrors, you can’t ignore them anymore.

Modeling released by SPI-MO on December 15 suggested a “high-level scenario” of infections, peaking between 600,000 and 2 million per day with current Plan B restrictions between late December and January, with up to 6 million. 000 deaths per day, peaking between mid-January and mid-March.

In fact, infections currently average around 180,000 per day and may have already peaked in parts of the country, with deaths averaging just over 150 per day.

Even when new data confirmed what South African scientists had said, Sage was dismissive, noting in his December 20 minutes: “The number of infections and hospitalizations in Gauteng [a province in South Africa] seems to be going down. The reasons for this are unclear and it cannot be assumed that this will continue. “

MP Mark Harper, chairman of the anti-lockdown group Covid Recovery, said ministers were once again guilty of blithely following expert advice rather than questioning advisers and looking at the photo in the turn.

“The whole history of the pandemic shows that ministers need to ask better questions,” he said, “to challenge advice and really understand what they are being told so they can compare it to all the other factors that they must take into account. in the best interest of the country.

The darkest predictions for the omicron wave now seem certain to have been far from the truth. The problem for the government is that if a more dangerous and resistant variant of the vaccine presents itself, it could prove difficult to persuade an increasingly cynical public to do as it is told.

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